Loading indicator
News & Reviews
Last 7 Days


Details of the new and updated Porsche models launching in Australia in 2016.

 

2016_porsche_macan-gts_overseas_02c

Macan GTS – January

Deliveries of the Macan GTS will commence early in the year, with the sporty, gap-filling model in the brand’s smallest SUV line offering buyers a more aggressive look to the rest of the range.

There’s plenty of black highlights on the outside, including quad exhausts, and it’s not just appearance that differs for the GTS – the car features a modified chassis with lowered suspension, and the GTS’s 21-inch wheels help fill the arches. Inside, there’s a new media system with Apple CarPlay, too.

Under the bonnet is a 3.0-litre twin-turbo petrol with 265kW and 500Nm, which is 11kW and 40Nm more than the entry-level petrol S.

Priced at $109,500 plus on-road costs it’s $22,800 more than the Macan S petrol and $12,900 less than the flagship Macan Turbo.

Read our review here.

 

2016_porsche_911-carrera_overseas_01

911 Carrera – March

The all-turbocharged updated 911 Carrera and 911 Carrera S will arrive in Australia sporting a revised look and new gear in March.

That’s right – this isn’t the 911 Turbo, but it is the 911 turbo. The move to forced-induction engines is driven by emissions regulations, with the brilliant 3.6-litre flat six replaced by a 3.0-litre turbo flat-six, with 272kW of power for the Carrera and 309kW for the Carrera S – up 15kW and 60Nm over the old versions.

Fuel consumption savings are also promised, with the PDK-equipped Carrera now listing 7.4 L/100km on the NEDC test cycle and the Carrera S listing 7.7L/100km. Those figures represent 0.8L/100km and 1.0L/100km improvements respectively.

Apple CarPlay will be offered standard, as will front parking sensors and a reverse-view camera.

As has been the case for eons, the 911 Carrera will be offered with a manual gearbox (seven-speed) or Porsche’s PDK dual-clutch seven-speeder. And it will be offered as a Coupe or Cabriolet.

Read our review of the 2016 Porsche 911 Carrera here.

2016 Porsche 911 Carrera and Carrera S pricing (plus on-road costs):
911 Carrera coupe manual – $217,800
911 Carrera coupe PDK – $223,750
911 Carrera S coupe manual – $252,800
911 Carrera S coupe PDK – $258,750
911 Carrera Cabriolet manual – $239,300
911 Carrera Cabriolet PDK – $245,250
911 Carrera S Cabriolet manual – $274,300
911 Carrera S Cabriolet PDK – $280,250

 

2016_porsche_911_carrera-4s_04

911 Carrera 4 and 911 Carrera 4S – Q2

The 911 range expands to include all-wheel drive in the second quarter of the year when the Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S models arrive.

These all-wheel-drive models bring the same turbocharged six-cylinder engines as are also fitted to the regular Carrera and Carrera S models, but they’re faster due to the additional traction on offer (0-100km/h for the Carrera 4 is 4.1 seconds – 0.1sec faster than the rear-drive; 4S is 3.8sec, also 0.1sec quicker).

The Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S models adopt wider wheel arches, and can be had as a coupe or Convertible.

Porsche 911 Carrera 4 and 4S pricing (plus on-road costs):
911 Carrera 4 Coupe – $233,900
911 Carrera 4S Coupe – $269,000
911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet – $255,400
911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet – $290,500

 

2016_porsche_911_targa-4s_01

911 Targa 4 and Targa 4S – Q2

Porsche’s other ‘regular’ 911 variant, the Targa, will join the 4 and 4S models before the middle of 2016.

The shell-back convertible model features a semi-hardtop lid, with the rear glass section lifting up to stow the roof behind the rear seats. It takes 19 seconds to do its thing, and yeah, it’s a bit complicated, but it harks back to the Targa model of old.

The Targa is only available with all-wheel-drive, and also debuts the new turbo engines offered in the other 911 models.

Porsche 911 Targa 4 and Targa 4S pricing (plus on-road costs):
911 Targa 4 – $255,400
911 Targa 4S – $290,500

 

911 Turbo S und 911 Turbo S Cabriolet

911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S – early Q3

Originally we thought the new Porsche 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S would arrive in May, but that (er) may be pushed out to early in the third quarter of 2016.

The new Turbo (read: not the regular turbo) model is more powerful than before, with the 3.8-litre bi-turbo six-cylinder engine now pushing out 397kW, while the Turbo S churns out 427kW. That’s 15kW up on both models.

And so the 911 Turbo S Coupe sprints to 100 km/h in 2.9 seconds, down 0.2sec, while its top speed of 330km/h is 12 km/h higher than before. The 911 Turbo now reaches the 100km/h mark in 3.0sec (down 0.2sec) and its top speed is now 320km/h – five clicks faster.

Because going fast is just as fun topless, the Turbo and Turbo S models are again offered with coupe and Convertible body styles.

Porsche 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S pricing (plus on-road costs):
911 Turbo – $384,900
911 Turbo Cabriolet – $406,400
911 Turbo S – $456,500
911 Turbo S Cabriolet – $478,000

 

2016-porsche-718-boxster-cayman

718 Boxster and 718 Cayman – Q4

The new-generation Porsche Boxster and Porsche Cayman will see numbers added to their names in 2016 following an expected debut at the 2016 Paris motor show. But the changes will be much more than just a name…

Following the lead of the larger 911, both the 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman will embrace turbocharging technology with the introduction of the 2016 update.

The 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman will trade their 2.7-litre flat six engines for equally powerful 2.0-litre flat four-cylinder turbos, doing away with the current divide that positions the Cayman above the Boxster in the power stakes.

Reflecting this – and again mirroring the 911 range structure – the 718 Cayman coupe will now assume the entry-level position beneath the 718 Boxster roadster in terms of pricing.

It’s been speculated that the 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman’s new 2.0-litre turbo engine will produce roughly 178kW, which would be down from the current 2.7-litre engine’s 195kW output in the Boxster and 202kW in the Cayman.

The turbo motor will no doubt improve dramatically on the 280Nm and 290Nm currently produced by the Boxster and Cayman respectively, however. That extra torque should see both cars improve on their 0-100km/h times, currently pegged at 5.4 seconds for the hardtop and 5.5sec for the soft-top.

Stay tuned for more on the 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman in 2016.




SHARE THIS ARTICLE