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Fiat Chrysler (FCA) and Ferrari boss Sergio Marchionne has told multiple outlets that a new Ferrari Dino is on the cards, but wouldn’t speculate on the timing.

“It’s a when not an if”, the outspoken Ferrari chief told Autoblog when questioned about plans to revive the Dino name. “We know that [Dino] is an under-used resource, but that’s why we need to get it right,” Marchinonne continued.

The original Dino was sold under its own brand between 1968 and 1974, and featured a small V6 engine mounted behind the driver and passenger. The V8-powered 308 GT4 began life in 1973 as a Dino model before rebadged as a Ferrari in 1976.

The new car could be powered by a turbocharged V6 engine. Marchionne speculated that the modern Dino could have around 500 horsepower (373kW). He continued that internal response to a V6-powered car had been “positive”.

Although Ferrari’s current models are exclusively powered by V8 and V12 engines, it makes V6 engines for other brands in the FCA stable. Its V6 motors are presently used by Maserati, and its designs will also be employed by Alfa Romeo for its upcoming range of rear-wheel drive vehicles.

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Above: Ferrari Dino captured by Flickr user Allen Watkin.

While the original Dino was created to lure customers away from the Porsche 911 via a lower price point, the Ferrari boss told Autocar that any Dino revival “will not be a cheap Ferrari”. This means that the new Dino will not significantly undercut the price leader in the current Ferrari range, the circa-$400,000 California T.

It’s not known if the new Dino will supplant a model in the current Ferrari range or be an addition to it.

The British magazine speculates that the new Dino will be an additional model, and that its more efficient turbocharged V6 engine will help the company bring down its overall fuel efficiency rating. With the company set to be, partially, cut free from the FCA mothership, it can’t rely on miserly Fiat 500s to offset its gas guzzling performance models under some corporate averaging schemes.

Cover image by Flickr user mfrascella.




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