Ford Mondeo Titanium EcoBoost Review

$31,490 $48,490 Mrlp
  • Fuel Economy
    8L
  • Engine Power
    149kW
  • CO2 Emissions
    187g
  • ANCAP Rating
    5Stars

The Ford Mondeo remains competitive in its class despite its age. The Titanium is well appointed, and the EcoBoost engine adds a bit of spark.

Despite being unveiled at the 2012 Detroit Motor Show, we’re still waiting with bated breath for the new Ford Mondeo to arrive. After repeated delays, it’s expected to hit the Australian market in early 2015.

This new-generation version will take on greater significance because CarAdvice expects it to effectively replace the Falcon from 2017, straddling the medium and large car segments for Ford.

The current-generation Ford Mondeo has been gracing showrooms since 2007, albeit with a few facelifts along the way, and we thought it worthwhile to revisit a model that must continue to battle the likes of the Mazda 6 and Subaru Liberty for another year.

Notably, the Mondeo was the first in the Ford line-up to offer one of the company’s EcoBoost engines that combine turbocharging and direct injection. The Falcon, Focus ST, Kuga, Fiesta and EcoSport have all since followed, with engines of various sizes.

The Ford Mondeo is only available in a wagon or a hatch/liftback; it’s not available in a sedan. Ford pitches the Mondeo as a medium car, but if you take a look at the measurements it’s already a similar size to the Falcon.

The liftback is wider and taller than the Falcon sedan – 1886mm wide versus the Falcon’s 1868, and 77mm taller. The Mondeo is shorter though: 4784mm compared to 4967mm.

We’ve previously reviewed the mid-spec Ford Mondeo Zetec EcoBoost and the Titanium we’re testing here takes a step up when it comes to getting bang for your buck. Priced at $44,990 plus on-roads, the extra $7250 buys, among many other things, a sportier body kit, lowered sports suspension, 18” alloy wheels, leather interior touches and a suite of safety features.

This Mondeo is powered by a 2.0-litre four-cylinder turbo petrol engine with a 2.0L turbo diesel as your alternative option in the middle and top-spec models.

It produces 149 kW of power at 6000 rpm with 300Nm of torque available between 1750 and 4500 rpm. With peak torque available across such a broad range, it’s responsive and more than capable of handling city driving as well as winding country roads.

The beauty of the EcoBoost is that it offers a 26 per cent improvement in power, and a 44 per cent jump in torque compared to the previous 2.3L Duratec petrol engine. It’s a little sluggish if you push the throttle too hard too early, but it performs well once you push through the low-down turbo lag into the torque band.

It has a six-speed dual-clutch auto and the engine is responsive shifting easily up and down through the gears. Its acceleration from a standstill is acceptable without threatening to turn into performance car so don’t expect to win if you try drag racing off a red light (for the record, CA does not condone this type of behaviour). That being said it’s not a tortoise; off the line you’ll hit 100km/h in 7.9sec.

When it comes to fuel economy there’s a bit of a discrepancy between official figures and our test results. According to its ADR81 fuel cycle, the Mondeo chews through 8.0L/100km, though at the end of 2012 we found it consumed more than that at 10.8L per hundred kilometres in mixed driving conditions.

We’ve previously reviewed the mid-spec Ford Mondeo Zetec EcoBoost and the Titanium certainly takes a step up when it comes to getting bang for your buck. Priced at $44,990 plus on-roads, the extra $7250 buys, among many other things, a sportier body kit, lowered sports suspension, 18-inch alloy wheels, leather interior touches and a suite of safety features.

Though the interior may be starting to show its age in some aspects, particularly the lack of a touchscreen or dash-mounted monitor, it’s neat and tidy. The brushed-chrome finishes are its saving grace, adding a touch of modern style while the dash is all soft touch plastics. It also scores heated sports seats with leather and Alcantara trim.

The interior space stands out more, though. Rear legroom is 95cm, rear headroom 97cm and there’s 14cm of shoulder room. If you still need convincing in regards to its size, the cargo space is cavernous. With the rear split-fold seats up there’s 816 litres of space; fold them flat and that jumps to a whopping, big-wagon-like 1919L. Watch a video showing the boot space here.

Cabin storage, however, is a bit light on. The driver and front passenger may be accommodated for with two cupholders, large side pockets and a deep centre console bin, but the rear passengers will have to make do with small side pockets, small pockets on the back of the front seats and a fold-down armrest with cup-holders.

Maintaining a touch of questionable old-school charm, the Titanium comes equipped with an ashtray for rear passengers. Though there is a 12V outlet, there is no cigarette lighter.

Despite the lack of a touchscreen and therefore sat-nav, the Mondeo still has you covered with a lot of the mod cons. All variants get voice control, with Bluetooth and USB connectivity. The Mondeo Titanium gets a Sony sound system with nine speakers. There’s also a sunroof and dual-zone climate control.

The Titanium does shine among the Mondeo range because of its suite of active safety features, which include forward collision warning, adaptive cruise control, blind spot monitoring and lane departure warning.

When it comes to passive safety, the Mondeo is also well kitted out: seven airbags, electronic stability control (ESC), traction control, emergency brake assist and anti-lock braking (ABS). The mid-sized Ford has a five-star ANCAP safety rating.

Regardless of whether the Mondeo ends up being considered a medium or large car in the market, it’s worth considering if you’re looking for a family car. The Titanium especially continues to hold its own in terms of safety tech and some sportily stylish touches, though all models are incredibly spacious for its size.

The Ford Mondeo is ageing gracefully, though let’s hope there are no further delays for the new model.