Holden chairman and managing director Mike Devereux says the iconic brand will remain a “great part of the automotive culture” long after the company stops building cars in Australia in 2017.

Amid rumours the Holden brand and famous lion logo could be replaced with General Motors’ global Chevrolet division and its bowtie badge from 2018, Devereux says the homegrown brand is here to stay.

“One thing people need to understand is Holden is not leaving Australia – Holden is committed to the auto industry in this country,” he insisted.

“What will happen is that Holden will become an importer of vehicles like most of our competitors. We still have over 230 dealers, we expect that we will be a thriving brand in this country for many years to come.”

chevrolet-spark

The outgoing boss – who will take up a senior role with GM’s consolidated international operations division in China from January before it relocates to Singapore in Q2 – says the Holden brand has enormous emotional value in Australia.

“I know in this country we have a unique place in being a brand that’s really only sold in Australia and New Zealand, so our brand has a lot more of an emotional connection to the country,” he said.

“We remain committed to being a great part of the automotive culture in this country with the Holden brand through our dealers for many, many years to come.”

With the exception of Holden’s Commodore-based products, every vehicle in its line-up is sold as a Chevrolet in other markets around the world. Australia- and New Zealand-specific Holden badges, grilles and other components are fitted to vehicles at the time of assembly at their manufacturing plants in countries like South Korea, Thailand and the US.

The lion badge has appeared on Holden vehicles for 85 years. It was first introduced in 1928, and has been redesigned three times since, in 1948, 1972, and to its current form in 1994.

Holden earlier this week refused to confirm the demise of the Commodore nameplate when local manufacturing ceases in 2017, leaving the possibility that the large car badge will continue as an imported model.




  • Westie

    Not forgetting, of course, it was Mr Devereux that said “no decision had been made on Holden’s future” the day before the announcement. Methinks he speaks with forked tongue.

    • Sumpguard

      Yeah I’d be taking it with a grain of salt. They have to remain upbeat for the sake of their employees who seem to have been the ones forgotten in this sorry story.
      Their future in Australia as an importer is entirely dependent on support from consumers just like any other brand.

      • ixlplix

        As for Holden, I think it’s a dead name. It represented Australia, or Australianism. With everything coming from OS, the brand name is meaningless. Hopefully people will see that and shop accordingly.

        • fred09

          James Holden was an American.

          • ixlplix

            But it’s what it came to stand for. Australian made car.

          • Donaldo

            What? You dingbat!!! James Alexander Holden was born in Walsall, Staffordshire, ENGLAND, and came to the Colony of South Australia in the mid 1800s, like the rest of us, including my family. Next you will be trying to say Mr Harley and Mr Davidson were American….they were British Too!!!

    • Daniel D

      Why is it so hard to understand that a company like GM would have several options already thought through that they could act on.

      After the kangaroo court of the productivity commission and Joe Hockeys theatrics, they realise its all over and pull the pin.

  • guest

    Why should I believe him? Tomorrow he’ll tell us that the brand is being replaced with Chevrolet.
    We were told one thing the other day and then something different. In any case, I don’t like the current global GM cars at all.

    • Pauly

      So why does it matter if they keep the Holden name or not if you dont like the current global GM Cars?

      I guess you have just proven what Holden/GM Marketing are considering. Regardless of which badge is on the front of the car, we will be getting imported cars regardless.

      What their marketing teams will be discussing now is “How many can we sell with a Holden badge vs Chevrolet badge”

      Once they figure that out, that will determine if Holden is renamed or not.

      • Alexander Sambuco

        They also have to factor in the cost of switching from Holden to Chevrolet. The dealership fit outs, the legal costs, this will all add up.

        • Westie

          Look how well selling GM Korea products badged as Chevrolet went in Europe.
          I wonder if “The Opel Experiment” was a trial to see if they’d sell to replace Holden’s?

          • ixlplix

            That could be a strong possibility.

          • Automotive Employee

            Not true, Opel made the decision to expand beyond its’ traditional region of Europe to reduce its’ dependence there due to the declining vehicle sales. Kind of like saying ‘don’t put all your eggs in the one basket’. Opel may supply vehicles under other brands for GM in foreign regions but they as a brand don’t have a strong basis in Asia or anywhere else. Hence, they decided to expand to new regions to start afresh – e.g. Eastern Europe, China, South-East Asia, and of course Australia, to capitalise on this.

            Their failure to stay in Australia should be a reminder of how new brands cannot be expected to succeed without long-term perseverance and strategy in the market. VW group took over 15 years to reach where they are today through consistent pricing and product placements. Hyundai and Kia too respectively have grown significantly during that period of time as well evolve to establish themselves as mainstream brands. It shows the car companies that the Australian public are willing to give loyalty to a brand if they are prepared to weather the tough times of small sales figures with competitive pricing wars and even loss figures per unit to deliver good products and services. After all we value brands that give us the assurance that they look after us, eg. Toyota has very strong after-sales experience with their customers that has remain consistent by consumer market ratings, thus long-term brand loyalty.

            As is the case for Holden, the writing has been on the wall for a very long time that making cars was simply too expensive to exercise compared with importing cars. The same went with Ford. And although the news is crushing that these two iconic brands that shaped our landscape will change, they are still willing to stay around for brand loyalty. Our marketshare is tiny compared with other countries and highly segregated (with annually 1 million units sold with 66 competing brands, compared even with the US with 10 million units with just over 40 brands).

            Holden will stay on for years to come without a doubt as it wouldn’t make sense to simply introduce a foreign brand (for Australia) to replace an established brand that people are familiar with. Plus this cycle of Australian car brands fallen under the might of lack of tariff protections, strong unions, influx of currency rates, changing consumer preferences and overall negative perceived view of manufacturing in this country is not new – think Nissan and Mitsubishi years ago. Although their situation was different in details, their path towards ending manufacturing was similar – external factors pushing them as well as internal pressure from their parent companies to make a profit. Importing cars has come to make sense for those two brands and has been met in positive light with both brands bouncing back. The sales figures might not be the same as when they made cars here but regardless they got out of the red and started to make money again as a business.

            Holden and Ford can do the same, they can bounce back as a brand. The only difference is they may no longer be able to claim their cars as ‘made in Australia’. They could be influenced by Australians through local design and engineering to some degree but they’ll be foreignly made.

            Mike Devereux and Bob Graziano regardless of how much bashing they receive are both good executives. Even though he receives a promotion soon Mike should be credited for his persistence in pushing for more global integration in technologies with other GM products we wouldn’t have the VF Commodore that we have today. And staying for the duration of development as his predecessors had short tenders that interpreted product development. And Bob decided to do the humane act of telling his employees and suppliers of the company intentions and extend his contract to see the transition of change long before they came to fruition in 2016 (we must remember that it takes roughly three years to develop a vehicle for production so coming clean now before production starts of the next update gives suppliers a chance to plan ahead). They do these things because they both see that we value our brands quite passionately. We’re the only country in the world that build a Motorsport around two unique rear-wheel drive vehicles.

            If we think about it, we’re the only country in the world that offers a car so efficiently packaged and planned that fits the purpose of being a family car, sports car, workhorse and luxury car from one platform. In the US, you wouldn’t see a car of similar size even attempt to create such diverse products off the one platform (think Taurus, Accord, larger Sonata and 6). And even more strangely our large segment vehicles offer the most valued for money equation per dollar in metal (Toyota included with the Camry/Aurion synergy). This uniqueness is quite unheard of overseas as for example, the price of a Ford Falcon XT would work out to be equivalent to that of 2.0L Focus in England.

            But getting back to the topic, re-invention and perseverance will be key for these hard times, even for the workers who will eventually lose their jobs to changing times as difficult as it may seem. But we’re lucky to live in a country where our lifestyle is relatively comfortable compared to our neighbours and we uphold the traditional attitudes of seeing hard times in a positive manner.

          • blah

            I checked out the Opel insignia 2.0lt turbo diesel its fuel average was 8.8 compared to the SV6 VF which was 9.0 , the Opel was dearer to buy had less power and smaller cabin space.

        • Tone

          Assuming, of course, that the current Holden dealers will continue on post-2017. If I were a single franchise Holden dealer, I’d be either looking for another franchise (or two) or I’d be looking to quit. Holden’s name will be mud by 2017, and Chevrolet/Cadillac branding won’t be much better.

          My prediction: Assuming Hyundai launch a ute in 2016-17, expect a lot of country Holden dealers to become Hyundai dealers. That is if a lot of Holden dealers don’t decide to sell Mazdas, Nissans and/or VWs in the meantime.

    • fred09

      There’s a lot of brand equity in the name.

      And Chevrolet is difficult to pronounce and spell. They’ve also said they don’t want the hire car models diluting the brand when selling the Corvette.

      • Raphael Chapman

        if Chevrolet is hard to say, just call it Chevy (Shě-Vē).

        • Donaldo

          Not if you are French..;). No problem here tho, Chevs have been in Australia since the 1920s…yes we even call them Chevrolet’s and Chevy’s…amazing isnt it? It was Holden Motor Bodies that made the Chevs in Australia…thats why GM bought into them. And Pontiacs and Olds..all made here. The last “Real” CHev here was the Chev trucks of the 1970s. THo we sent Statesmans and Monaros to Sth Africa etc as Chevys, and latter Caprices and Luminas to the ME. Our Auto history is a long as the USA’s.

  • Dave W

    He also said Holden wasn’t closing down. You know how that went.

  • Trevor Klaproth

    You can expect to see the monthly sales of Commodore to drop to 800 per month, the same as Falcon numbers. In that case, the Commodore will be dumped long before 2017, just as it is highly unlikely that Falcon will stagger on until 2016. There will eventually be a fire sale of unsold Commodores as they accumulate in droves in holding yards. The good news is the price of the base model Commodore will substantially drop to match the current Falcon price of $32,990 drive away. If Commodore staggers on to the end of 2017, which it wont, you will see a drive away price for the Commodore of $25,990 just to clear the left over dead carcasses that remain in holding yards. Sedan based ute, wagon and the V8 engine option will cease to exist forever after 2017. It is also probable that no manual option will exist after 2017 on any possible mythical Chevrolet replacement. After 2017, you can also expect Chevrolet to do a disappearing “Opel” manoeuvre, bring in Chevrolet and try the market for 12 months and then disappear completely because sales are abysmal & the market is too small with too much competition to be profitable. GM USA don’t need
    Holden Australia & GM USA have no loyalty to Australian brand names. GM completely killed the Pontiac brand in the USA with the stroke of a pen and GM USA will think nothing of killing off completely the insignificant irrelevant local Holden
    brand. Why waste time on introducing Chevrolet to Australia after 2017 when
    Australians wont even buy their own Holden brand name now, no loyalty.

    • This Dude

      Good analysis, I like it. Adding to what you said, GM also (almost) killed Saab.

      • Unions

        The unions killed SAAB, Pontiac, Hummer and Saturn. The GFC was the catalyst to force GM into Chapter 11 to get rid of the union conditions and awards. Then GM got the funds from the US government. Holden was lucky not to go then.

        Since, Sweden government did the same thing and let SAAB go, NEVS finally picking it up and production assumed a couple of weeks back, minus all the perks and awards.

        The unions killed Holden, the government was subsiding each employee to a tune of 55k per year….

        • ixlplix

          That isn’t correct. SAAB was purchased by GM to kill. That’s why they didn’t want anyone else to have the badge. Pontiac was one to many brands selling the same thing in the same market. Hummer died because it was and is a totally impractical suburban vehicle. they couldn’t get the sales after Arnie’s carisma wore off. Holden is going because of a decision made in GM HQ to build a bigger car when the world was down sizing. Nothing complicated, just bad management. Like most of GM

          • GM tooks its time to kill

            GM purchase 50% of SAAB in 1989 and the rest in 2000.

          • ixlplix

            So how long did it take to kill either Ford or Holden in this country. Ford plan began in 98. That’s 15 years.

          • Bad Management?

            In 2002 Holden sold 88,478 units about as many Corolla and Mazda 3 sold combined for 2013. Hence, the Zeta platform was chosen, 11 years later you come along and know better, LOL

          • ixlplix

            Large cars were slowing, especially OS. As well as here. 11 years in the old money is 3 model cycles Yeah I know better.

          • Cobrajet

            The world wasn’t really down sizing, except for the Camry. They did use lighter materials and smaller engines, but their dimensions increased. It takes Holden 10 years for them to build a car from scratch. The VF was half into way that period, it was just a face-lifted VE. Updating the existing car and making the Cruze was all they can do, it was not the decision. The decision was to shut down Holden anyway because they couldn’t break even, and to concentrate on US built models. How you could expect them to design and build new a car in less than half a year, that’s going to end up a failure and a waste of more money. Building a car “we want” wont save it, its too late because the consumers had to change their mind at the last minute, why haven’t they said anything earlier if they really wanted to a buy Holden, instead of whinging about government handouts.

          • ixlplix

            To be perfectly honest I don’t understand some of what you’ve written. But let me try and interpret. Model cycles have always run approximately three years. The Euros and Japanese, Koreans are still around that time frame, though some in financial trouble (Mitsubishi) have stretched it out for some models. Here in Australia, that was the usual thing as well, but they steadily moved from new models to face lifts, leaving essentially the same car in production longer and longer. Now it’s been admitted by Ford and holden that they put off the totally new models because the companies were in trouble. that’s why we only have the VF and Ford still haven’t released their facelift. Holden has probably been on the chopping block as long as Ford Australia, another reason for no commitment on anything new. As you know it was around the time of the taurus out here that Ford made it’s first serious move to get us to buy something else. Or maybe they just thought that the AU was so dodgy that bringing something uglier here would soften the blow. Either way, that was the beginning of the end.

          • Cobrajet

            You bring up a very good point about updating cars. Any car will survive as long as it’s new. But model cycles don’t change it all at once. Every three years there are facelifts, then every 6-10 years their is a full make over. VF update was of course a heavily remodelled VE, but Holden had been doing this always with the VK VR and VY Commodores, It would of been better if they did all from scratch, but you can’t say they haven’t done anything new, there was lots of equipment upgrades and better interior, the only problem was the new front end styling just made it feel dated again. In Australia though they had a new car 10 every years, they updated that car every year with those series 2 updates. In Europe and Japan they can make cars with better quality, when we make a new car it’s going to end up with some new issues so they have to be updated enough to perfection. If we rush our cars too much they will end up with quality issues, that’s why people avoid early production models. But Ford should be blamed for not updating instead of Holden, what Holden done with the VF Ford should have more than a year ago, not only that, the FG Falcon wasn’t really good enough at all, it lacked features that other Fords had, the trim levels weren’t that great, it wasn’t that interesting apart from the performance.

            What I was saying is that people were calling the end of the Auto Industry because we were still still making large sedans, when there is still a market for them. If no one is buying Commodores then why are they still in the top 10 best sellers, it’s the rest of the Holden range that is failing them, Holden couldn’t make them here because no one would buy them, neither could Holden do anything about those cars, because they aren’t made in Australia. If Holden or GM for that matter was to make to make a completely new kind of car in Australia at this time, it would be too risky, and pointless waste of money, because they would have shut down anyway because of high labour costs and horrible management.

            The reason why Holden is gone is because Ford is gone, they were mutually dependable. Ford wanted to leave Australia, so they imported their Taurus, but American cars weren’t good enough to compete outside of America, despite the ugly styling of the AU it was still a good car, less dodgy than the Commodore. When the financial crisis came, Ford and GM needed to do some reorganizing , Ford came up with one ford policy, that means they will make global cars like the japanese & Europeans do, not different cars made in different countries. The problem was it didn’t include the Falcon, recently they opened a new factory in Thailand making Australia obsolete. For the past 10 years Ford has let the Falcon to rot with neglection so the sales can drop, then asked the government for “financial assistance” before announcing their departure. Holden at least showed commitment to staying, the CEO Mike Devereux wanted Holden to stay, but GM had changed him and Holden is gone. There were some signs that Falcodores were gone, Ford had Holden had deleted some models before stopping it all together (eg Fairlane, XR8, falcon wagon, Berlina, Statesmen).The selling of the Chevrolet SS in us, like the Pontiac G8 was before killing of the Pontiac brand, mean’t that Holden would be next.
            I say the end started with Ford, they could of make the Falcon into modern car like the Focus and the Fusion and people would still buy them despite the popularity of SUVs and higher fuel prices instead they had let it die, so people would say there is no market for it any more, therefore they would say the with the same reason with their “fake outrage” for Holden even though it’s still popular. The sad thing about this no one else would make cars like we did. What Ford and GM now owe us is replacements for these two vehicles (imported from America which was why they killed ours) or what we can do is nationalise our industry and hand it to full aussie ownership.

          • ixlplix

            Your last sentence is on the money

          • Let The Truth Be Told

            100% correct, GM do a few things well, they mostly manage their assets badly, they destroy strong brands because they mostly build underdone rubbish, throw away cars a specialty, but a few gems shine through, the corvette and ev.

          • Robert Ryan

            Which they build in LHD format for the UK “managing assets badly”

          • Let The Truth Be Told

            Why am I not surprised, to be frank any negative GM press greatly excites me, its a company I loathe with a passion, shame Holden was associated with it.

          • blah

            Hummer was originally a go anywhere military vehicle it was too big for normal use.

        • fred09

          SAAB was a pointless car sold in a tiny market. Pontiac was killed off because GM didn’t know what it stood for (it started as an economy model, then a sports model, then they tried mixing the two. The AzteK and the LeMans didn’t help). The Hummer was too expensive and everyone knew it was just a tricked up GMC and the Saturn was made from plastic.

          • Tone

            GM did their best to run Saab into the ground, mainly because Saab’s engineers and designers would give their Detroit overlords a great big ‘F U’ at every opportunity (remember the tribute to Saab on Top Gear, where Clarkson pointed out that GM would tell Saab to use a GM parts bin GPS, only to discover by accident that Saab decided to design their own instead). Then, of course, there was the dodgy accounting, where GM would charge Saab exhorbitant prices for components such as engines (much how Air New Zealand bent over and screwed Ansett, and how QANTAS is now cross-subsidising Jetstar).

            The only things that saved Saab were (a) protest rallies across the world where thousands of Saab fans ran ‘Save Saab’ convoys, and (b) an entrepreneur that happened to be a Saab nut. Somehow I can’t see many thousands of Holden fans organising such rallies, nor can I see some entrepreneur going in hard to try and wrest Holden away from GM.

            As it turned out, GM made it too hard for said entrpreneur to do anything with Saab anyway, so now it’s owned by the Chinese. But it’s still going.

            Clearly some people want a ‘pointless car sold in a tiny market’.

          • Let The Truth Be Told

            Spot on Tone

          • fred09

            If the SAAb was so wonderful why did no one buy it ?
            Because it was pointless.

        • guest

          Have you got documents to show prove this? (ie, not just Andrew Bolt or Piers Akerman opinion pieces).

          The worst enemy of Holden was the parent company GM itself.

          It badly needed a better parent company.

          What should have happened with Holden is at the introduction of VE, it should have had the engines and features that came along with the last version of the VE, or at least some of the VF technology. I believe that was the idea until management plans changed.

    • WayneTSV

      I think the exact opposite will happen. There is MUCH more of an emotional attachment to Commodore than Falcon, expect to see a spike in Commodore sales.

      • Rocket

        Unless you prefer Falcons of course.

      • Donaldo

        No, not really. The Falcon goes back to 1960 in Australia, when it was a puny American compact, and redesigned for Oz Conditions. The Commodore started in 1979, as a puny German import that was massaged for Oz Conditions…prior to the Commie, the Kingswood got all the love, b4 that, the Belmont, b4 that the EH…etc to the humpy (FJ).

      • blah

        Commodore sales went up 25% after the news of shutting , Ford did the same , people want the last of ozzy made , when these are gone imports will rise in price with no local competition whats to stop them !

  • Nofears

    I can believe his statement about brand retention but it is mere corporate talk. The brand,it is the last refuge,the corporates always talk about the importance of the brand when things go pear shaped & I suspect its relevance will amount to very little within a decade.
    I really wonder what can be imported here by GM that is able to be made in RHD cost effectively which anyone will want over other imports?However they are playing the cards very closely,they have not stated the Commodore name is going nor the Holden name & a design department will still operate also. Will be an interesting time.
    Read a glowing review of the Chevrolet SS 6.2 litre this morning. A great pity it has been seen as not adding up, but having said that I suppose a vehicle such as this is overkill for most of us which is what has hung it up to dry in this country.

    • ixlplix

      Back to Opel

  • delux

    It would be a shame to see the Holden brand disappear after so many years, but when they are only selling rebadged Chevy’s, it makes sense for them to switch to the Chevy brand here. Will the loyalists care? Probably not. Why would they? Holden is Commodore and the rest of the models just fills the gaps; without Commodore, Holden is Chevy. Better to switch the name and leverage on the mighty marketing machine that has various sponsorship’s globally.

    • delux

      Alternatively, ditch the current crop of Holden’s and bring back the Opel models that just departed as Holdens.

      • ixlplix

        Bring them back, good idea, but kill Holden. It’s over for the name plate.

    • fred09

      They’re rebadged Daewoos. Not that there’s anything particularly wrong with Daewoos, apart from being a little dull. But that seems to work for Toyota.

      • delux

        Not really. The current crop are global GM cars built on global platforms.

  • Pauly

    Opel and Vauxhall live side by side in Europe. With the UK using the Vauxhall name and Europe using Opel.

    Why couldnt Holden be used for the Asia Pacific region and Chevrolet can stay where it is now?

    • delux

      GM needs to look at Ford and make one brand one car. They suck at multiple brands and kill them to prop up the US

      • Robert Ryan

        Which will be their downfall(For the 2nd time?)

    • http://wykop.kz/ Talgat Deshboraydyev

      Chevrolet is the global brand for ages, one of the most recognizable car markers except Toyota, Volkswagen or Renault.

      Holden… Only Aussies and car fans have some associations. To be honest – Holden isn’t completely recognizable around the world, you haven’t ever sell cars under this brand anywhere besides Australia.

      • blah

        In the early days Holden exported cars under its own name, In the 1950`s Holden exported cars to 55 overseas markets including Kenya , Malaya,New Zealand ,Fiji, New Guinea, Hong Kong, Philippines, even Japan in the mid 60`s all under the Holden banner , check the net and do some research

  • amlohac

    If Holden did get replaced by Chev, there would be quite a few bogans with Chev badges on their utes jumping for joy.

    • Cobrajet

      Even some bogans had cultural cringe of Australian cars, so they put the Chev badges on them to make them looked imported.

      • OzPup

        most bogans like the idea of aussie muscle. only the confused wannabe cashed up bogans put bowties on their cars, or those non-bogans that were wannabe cashed up bogans but didn’t have any bogan heritage (or flannys in the cupboard). True bogans, the ACADACCA playing, black jeans wearing, winny-blue smoking bogans loved the Lion.

        • Scott Wheeler

          OzPup, I think you’ve hit the nail on the head. I saw a bow-tie adorning a Commodore SS with a full-width “Aussie Pride” southern cross on the back window. If that’s not confused, I don’t know what is.

      • guest

        I think they purchased Hyundais, Nissans or Toyotas. After all, I got abused by a car load in a grey Hyundai out in Blacktown. My crime? Being on the side of the road, standing with a bicycle. Not even on the road!

        The HSV driver earlier in the day? A friendly wave and gave me plenty of room when he did go past.

        And don’t get me started on black Nissan utes or white Hiluxes with huge balloon tyres. Scary stuff.

        • matt

          yeah good point, though i hate riders on roads, the only true bogan types i see on the road these days drive 15 year old raised 4×4′s, with the diesel pump wound out to produce more smoke then an old locomotive.

        • Cobrajet

          What about those Honda Civics, they just look ridiculous, though they are not usually driven by bogans,

  • repus

    Can we believe you anyway my current Holden Commodore bought new as all my large Holdens when due for replacement will be replaced by another brand I do not care what you import after forty odd years as a Holden buyer you have lost my custom

    • Let The Truth Be Told

      Australian made Toyota, be a nice change for you to drive a car that doesn’t fall apart after 60000 KLM, GM have been treating all the Holden supporters as suckers and GM will need to wear that backlash as many won’t buy another GM product, sure as you know what sticks to a blanket I don’t blame them.

      • repus

        Well I have not had any problems with any of my Holdens currently Ve 60th anniversary before that aVP Commodore and when I sold it had 365000 k/ ms on it and it is still going
        Toyotas are good cars but just too bland

        • Let The Truth Be Told

          Yep Toyotas are bland, I’m amazed you got 365000 out of a VP, we had a VR and it was crud, it made 110000 and needed a whole host of new parts, a real pos. Since that dreadful VR we’ve had a long line of Hondas and due to business arrangements had to purchase a RAV, great mechanicals, lousy interior quality, trim marks very easy. I miss our Honda. The only Toyota I would consider is a Camry hybrid, best fleet car I’ve had. I just don’t trust GM, they make real garbage.

          • Repus

            Actually I would like a Nissan Altima or if you could get one a Hyundai Azera beautiful car .With the VP I used to get oil changed. Every 5000k/ms instead of every 10.000 also with VE have it done every 7500 k/ms leaving it to 15000 is too long
            Have a look at the Azera on google

          • Let The Truth Be Told

            I knew there’d be a reason. That’s your success, good maintenance and servicing, sadly GM products won’t tolerate neglect the same way a Toyota would, I say would because our new diesel RAV specified 10000 KLM for the first service, at 5000klm it had used half its oil and there was a rattle developing, I got the dealer to put Toyota synthetic in it and the engine went quiet after a few klms and it has just loosened up a bit more and runs great. But these long oil change intervals can’t be good only if you use top shelf synthetic oil, if ordinary mineral valvoline or Castrol is used you’ll be lucky to get to 100000, I must admit that Azere is very good looking, but lets hope the engineering has improved since the rattly Hyundai v6s of yore. We bought a Getz for my wife to learn in and what pos it is, low klms and rattly top end from valvoline, serviced every 7500 klms and the sludge was bad, if you go Hyundai keep doing what your doing and the life will be long, remember that all iron ore for Hyundai is from Australia, so we get a little return.

  • Raphael Chapman

    i’m from america, but i have empathy for the boys down under. maybe the Ute can continue with the new Alpha platform found on the 2014 Cadillac CTS, maybe america can get a new El Camino this way too.

  • crouchy35

    The only Holden brand name that held weight in this country was “Commodore”. Holden Barina, Chevrolet Barina, Daewoo Barina….. who cares?

    • Tone

      Heh… maybe GM could relaunch the Daewoo brand in Australia? Everyone knows what a Daewoo is, and the brand pretty much sums up everything you need to know about the Korean-made ‘Holdens’.

  • For the Rd

    No big deal!! start removing those bowties and stick a Holden badges on. Then your fully sick Chevy will look so unique and no one will ever know what brand of car it is when u zooming past in your Daewoo Matiz Chevy

  • gfys

    GM have just learnt two painful lessons about the equity and goodwill in established brands versus new to the market ones with Opel here and Chevy in Europe.

    The execs and bean counters would be foolish to dismiss the value of the Holden brand

    • Rocket

      It was a valuable brand in Australia when people cared about buying Australian made. I can’t see a Camaro being sold here under any brand other than Chevrolet and no one really cares about the Cruze or the Malibu too much whether they have a Holden badge or not.

    • Let The Truth Be Told

      GM do foolish well, stay tuned for GMs eventual demise within the next 10 years.

  • Opelman

    It was also said by a GM exec that Opel was here to stay too… I don’t see any Opel dealerships in Australia anymore! I would not trust a word anyone from GM says!

    • Golf

      I think he lies… in my opinion Holden brand will be replaced…

      • Zany

        Holden will go upmarket to Opel products sourced from cheap euro countries like Ukraine, plus a hero model from US.

        • Rocket

          Why not just stick a Holden badge on a Cadillac? Or is that too upmarket? Holden is dead just like the Commodore unfortunately.

  • WileE

    GM will build cheap cars in China,brand them Holden and sell them into Australia… cause they are very clever and can trick us.

    • Let The Truth Be Told

      100% correct, I’d go as far to say that the commodore tooling will be sent to China and other US models will be sourced from China just like clothes and electronics, so GM can trick us and rip us off. I recommend to anyone considering a GM product, buy something else.

  • MarksmanR

    They should make it the most boring brand name possible: “General Motors Australia” and put general engines in them with general styling and general build quality with a general price.

    • Guest

      Too late, Toyota beat them to it!

  • Zany

    Maybe a Chinese brand will make an offer for the whole plant and name just as they did with Saab. I think the Swedish govt partly owns Volvo they have more national loyalty than the LNP. Or maybe when abbot goes in 3years labour will reconstitute the subsidy system which has worked for the last 40 years. This govt has no national pride or loyalty stupid us listening to abbot.

    • Tone

      For anyone advocating Government ownership of Holden, I have two words for you: British Leyland.

      • Zany

        Many govts have interests in companies. About 20 to be exact.. And from developed countries too.

  • Cobrajet

    All the Holden was recently was the just the Commodore, the rest were global cars that were just imported If Chevrolet can make a large RWD sedan, wagon and ute with several trim levels export it here, put a Holden badge on and we have a new commodore. Commodores were made with imported parts anyway, the name originated from Opel. As long as the nameplate can be used properly on suitable replacement a “commodore” can still exist, not one some SUV or compact or sportscar but on a large RWD sedan. Holden or Chevy, Aussie or American it’s still GM.

  • Dr dope

    Who cares anymore i won’t be buying overseas built Holden. It won’t be Holden any more but xyz car…

  • john

    Without local manufacture,the lion badge means nothing. Leave its legacy with the last VF to avoid cheapening and insulting its meaning.
    If you can’t build locally,then don’t use the badge.Call yourselves Daewoo…..its what you’ll really be by then.

  • LowRezFez

    If the next gen rear drive car to replace the current Commodore was designed in Australia, was a bit smaller, offered the same body styles, had small turbo petrol engines, a diesel option and 8 speed autos and priced well. It could work. I would go as far as to drop the Commodore name, why not go back to the Holden Special, Premier and SS.

  • Tony Prior

    Holden is dead in our hearts now. It was always an American company but people bought their cars because of tariffs/nationalism/jobs/cheap parts……. Not any more ! Chevy, Cadillac and Buick are becoming huge in China and have no negative associations in Australia. We will just import them from China in 2018 and beyond.
    Ford and Toyota have never been seen as “Australian” as Holden and so there won’t be as much disappointment when they stop manufacturing here too. Holden is DEAD !

    As Australians we have huge distances between our capital cities but no home grown car company and no efficient national railway system and soon we will lose control of Qantas. We are a very very stupid people !

  • Guest

    Why not just design it here and build the Commodore in Thailand, just like almost every dual cab, Ford Focus just to name a few…

  • Wazdog

    Why not just design it here, build the Commodore in Thailand, like other countries car manufactures do… almost every dual cab, Ford Focus just to name a few

  • Holden Man

    Keep the name, it has infinitely more advertising recognition than Chevrolet and Holden’s marketing ability has always been incredible. They’ve managed to sell average imported cars in high numbers for years, not just the more recent Korean models. I mean, if they had never badged imported cars as Holden’s, then fine kill the name, but they’ve done so basically since the HB Torana, which had imported parts initially. Then there was the Gemini, which was simply assembled here and then, fully imported cars came in the early 80s.

  • LC

    Says the same guy who states “No decision has been made on Holden’s future” only to say “Holden will cease production by 2017″ 24 hours later.

    All the bad PR against Holden will take it’s toll against it over the coming years for this weeks decision, and the end result of that? GM Australia will decide it needs to re-invent itself. Then it’s goodbye Holden and hello Chevrolet, along with the Camaro and Corvette to take the V8 enthusiast’s minds off the Commodore’s fate.

  • Zany

    LC that’s because he was waiting for abbot to ratify the subsidy . When it was clear that they weren’t comming good with the measly 150mil he had the authority to pull the plug it’s not his fault . The fault lies with hockey and abbot. I don’t think they realise the enormity of what they’ve done. No package is going to help all the small businesses involved. This govt is simply stupid from top to bottom.

    • Hung Low

      Really so was Ford waiting for Rudd? These companies made this decision years ago. Part of the withdrawal plan was to minimise the costings of the process via scamming more money from the government.
      The writing has been on the wall in regards for the viability of building large cars for over a decade, especially for a small low volume local market. Australia should have been used to produce their niche (sports) and upper market luxury divisions like Cadillac and Lincoln if there was vision and intention to keep manufacturing here.

      • Nofears

        Cadillac & Lincoln? Am so pleased we did not have these horrible things imposed on us.If you can’t sell a Falcon or Commodore in sufficient numbers then it is unlikely these tanks will sell in any quantity.We had a brief time where Chevrolet Suburbans were imported but only because the Ambulance service was converting them for use. As far scamming from the government is concerned,that is an extreme comment. I guess in the US Obama did the wrong thing by offering support,it would have been disastrous for all if radical elements got their way & offered no support at all leading to an outcome I don’t want to think about.Bottom line it was not profitable & required injections of funds to keep it here.Some here sought to play politics with it. The unfortunate outcome we have in OZ is likely to be a reaction to saving your skin at home & addressing preconditions in exchange for being bailed out in the USA & a lack of vision from our political “leaders” who can’t grasp it aint all about the money honey.

        • Hung Low

          That is my point, the Australian division could have made the Cadillac and Lincoln models so much better. The local team have done wonders with the limited budgets they had for the Falcadores and with the budget and resources to continue as their niche arm with more profit per unit, the operation could maybe have continued past 2017

      • Zany

        That’s rot ford did not even try to export they were going all along. Holden were staying till Libs refused funding end of story.

        • Hung Low

          Please don’t let any facts get in your way with your personal LNP smear campaign on here.
          The Libs were offering the same funding as the ALP and required commitment from GMH. What is wrong with that?
          Besides there are many other manufacturing sectors and industries that are in dire straits and require funding attention as well.
          We are suffering the repercussions of both past governments, to soley blame a new government a few months into the role for GMH going is bordering on idiocy.

    • LC

      The reply function: Learn to use it.

      Decisions like this aren’t made in such small spaces of time. It would’ve taken time to view all the options they had, look at the financial cases for remaining here or not, short and long term over a variety of different situations, and adding up the cost of actually closing down.

      All Abbott wanted was clarification after documents were leaked from Holden suggesting they were closing up shop when the VF had run it’s course. They wouldn’t, and they shouldn’t, hand over any money if they plan on closing up rather than spending it on development, testing and the re-tooling of the factory in preparation for new models, which is where it’s needed and where it has always been spent. They were offering the same funding as Labor, with extra funding on top of that, and other things, being dependent on what the productivity commission comes up with.

      I daresay that Devereux knew about GM’s decision when he got his new job in China. Could he keep it a secret if he told Holden’s employees? No way. But could he keep it a secret if he alone knew it? Of course.

      And what about Labor? Did you know it was Keating’s Labor government that started scrapping our tariffs, which would’ve kept the flow of imports under control and ensured that everyone got a bigger slice of the Aussie car market pie? What steps did Rudd or Gillard take to re-introduce them when they saw what was happening over the 6 years they had in office? And what did they do to stop Mitsubishi and Ford leaving? Policy wise, what Abbott could’ve done is limited, only being in power for 12 weeks, having other things on his plate and whatnot. If Abbott is guilty of causing Holden’s fate, then every PM from Keating onwards is even more guilty.

  • Daniel D

    Holden represents Australian built cars. It should go at the same time as the last Commodore rolls down the line.

    To do anything else is plain disrespectful of what Holden was before GM got it. Keeping Holden sure won’t sell a car to me.

  • Scott Wheeler

    I remember the uproar when the Kingswood and Torana nameplates were killed off, and yet a new generation of bogans adopted the Commodore as their own. I’m as sad as the next Aussie to see the demise of the Falcon and the Commodore, but all good things must come to and end, and the world is not the same place it was in the 80′s. I will cherish the memories of these cars, and embrace what comes next. You just have to look at the success of the Mazda 3 to see where that’s going. In all honesty, I would enjoy driving a dynamic hatchback with a turbo engine and >200kW. It wouldn’t sound like a V8 or be as tyre-shreddingly brutal, but it would be a lot of fun…

    • Zany

      Well said. Let’s hope an Indian, Malaysian or Chinese takes over the assets and builds high end commodore for Asian consumption. It seems the only way out . Let the bidding begin. If poms can make cars with the crummy pound so high we can make them as our dollar will fall.

  • LeStori

    Well we will all be Holden onto that thought for at least a moment. Na might as well call the imported GM rubbish Chevrolet. It is a better fit.

  • Michael

    GM should perhaps look at changing the current vehicles to the Chevrolet brand, which are the Korean GM cars, and make Holden the Opel/Vauxhall cars instead. Holden as a brand would then be selling better quality cars, Holden Corsa, Holden Astra are better than Holden Barina (Chev Aveo) and Holden Cruze (Chev Cruze). GM though can’t make same mistake as they did with Opel, to try and sell them as a niche brand. They should only be about 10% – 15% more than the Korean GM cars. The Opel performance cars, OPC, can become the HSV vehicles. This would revive the Holden passion again in Australia, which I think was lost when Holden started selling the boring cars from Korea.

  • Zany

    I wonder how much a holden dealership is worth now. A lot less I’d expect by about 30percent. The Libs have stuffed someone’s retirement for sure.

    • Commonsense is not common

      But the Toyota dealership just went up in value.Libs just improved someone’s retirement for sure.
      Or does Labor get the credit for that?

      • Zany

        Yeah but the toyota dealership didn’t loose money or is that not commonsense

        • WileE

          Yeah but Toyota made money with govt support like GM made losses so feeding a loser like GM does not make any sense common otherwise.Taxpayer dollars are real and not play money.

          • Zany

            Where can you pay for 30,000 jobs plus and get a 20billion return minimum for a measly 150mill. If you read the holden statement he says we respect the policy of the govt. Thats damning enough evidence enough for me.

  • Guest

    To those of you saying that General Motors should keep the brand “Holden” please stop and think about this for a moment:

    From the Chevrolet brand of GM
    - Holden Corvette
    - Holden Camero
    - Holden El Camino (ute)

    Not going to work out at all, Holden is known for Commodore, so now try to say with with a straight face …

    - Holden Commodore which is actually the Cadillac CTS sedan and wagon.

    The best thing they can actually do is dump the Cruise, Barina and the Malbiu (which for l purposes are GM DAEWOO) and replace with Astra, Trax and Insigni all form GM OPEL.

    Sadly you would have to keep the Craptiva and Craptiva 7 as they have no otherSUV in the range.

    As for the Izzsu sourced vehicles, BRING BACK RODEO and dump Colorado … And the

    • gfys

      The Trax is from GM Korea too mate, it’s a jacked up Barina mate

    • Zany

      I think well get rebadged opels, a couple of Chinese, and maybe some Thai models.

  • john

    My first car was an HG Kingswood with 186 and 3 on tree. Four years later I replaced it with a VB Commodore 202 auto. The Trimatic was appalling rubbish,but that story is for another day.

    Both cars were reliable cruisers,more suited to winding country roads than city traffic.
    The red sixes had a great sound which i loved. The blue and black sixes in the VC on had an annoying flutter which I hated. They didn’t go that much better and were less regarded by mechanics.

    I now drive a 2012 Corolla sedan,which would be at least the size of an EH,or the first Commodore. It certainly isn’t a small car. I simply couldn’t justify a car the size of the current Falcon,Territory or Commodore,and the Cruze is just too Korean,made up mainly of Korean sourced parts. Local offerings just lack anything suitable for my personal needs. I really did look at Cruze,but just couldn’t get past its Korean-ness.

    As an Aspergers nerd, I’m a very deep thinker and predicted Holden would head into trouble with the VE,and Ford with the FG. By then I knew peoples tastes were changing, but Ford and Holden were not changing with them.

    You can’t sell people what sold 40 years ago. The secret is to sell them what they want now.

    • Zany

      Yes john GMH and ford are unable to change production quickly enough to meet market trends. Look at Hyundai every time you blink there’s a new improved model. But look at Volvo they have the same capacity but have about 5 different production models for different markets. But don’t forget we have 65 manufacturers in this market, far too many. It should be about 30.

  • Trevor Klaproth

    News Flash. The 2017 Holden Commodore will come from China where it will also be sold as a Buick. FWD and 4 cylinder engine in sedan only (definitely no wagon or ute).

    • Vti07

      I could be mistaken but I think GM manufacture the (Chevrolet) LHD Cruze over in China as apparently it sells quite well over there. They could easily setup a RHD Cruze production line for export as well.

    • Vti07

      Due to the stigma attached to Chinese made cars, this Commodore will very likely flop and go the way of the dodo. I remember VW once imported a manual Polo sourced from China and it didn’t sell very well.

      • Golfschwein

        I think the most likely reason that it flopped was because it was a dumpy looking thing. You know how hard it is to turn a good looking small hatchback into a good looking small sedan.

  • http://www.parisescortmm.com/ Adina Meyer

    Nice car…

  • m1n1s1n

    Holden is for Australians? Just like GM is for Americans?
    They have been building cars in Canada and Mexico for the American market since the 80s, Id prefer to see the Holden name gone and buried out of principle but at the end of the day, you don’t kill brand recognition, its just bad business

  • Smart US

    Deveraux is quite as trustable as Krudd and Guilard… i bet he will be running for US congress soon

    • Zany

      Nothing wrong with Ed dev. But there is something wrong with a govt policy that puts 30,000 Australians out of work. If you can’t admit it don’t say anything as these folk will be on new start and struggling soon enough without fools like you gloating.

    • Zany

      Turnaround tony is pretty trustworthy he’s just destroyed a national icon.

  • sute

    Could someone please tell Volkswagen that Holden needs new foster parents.

  • Nik

    Why not Australian government think about to buy Holden factory and to protect our workers, and to we have again OUR car. And to we can lift our heads and still be proud what we are. Money is nothing if our friends and neighbors stay without their jobs, that not impact just them, that will make problems for all of us. Sorry for my English, but every men will understand what I want to say.

    • Zany

      Exactly right nik. But we have to get either a foreign takeover by the Chinese or Indians to continue. The incompetent management at ford USA and GM USA couldn’t care less

  • Zany

    I saw a picture of abbot with a smirk saying how proud he was of what he had done. He doesn’t care about the nation he cried for 3 years when he lost the previous election now he doesn’t know what to do.

    • Rocket

      Who was the Government when Mitsubishi and Ford announced their closures? The death of the Australian auto industry has been a long slow process going back decades and at the moment our Federal and State Governments have billions to pay back to overseas banks. If money grew on trees we would could fund everything but this is the real world….

      • Zany

        There’s a difference between an investment and a subsidy. Ford and Mitsubishi did not try for overseas markets and don’t deserve our loyalty in the same way . Holden had established overseas markets and don’t to my mind deserve this treatment.

  • blah

    I say change the name to chevrolet after they shut down ,they already wanted to `can it` in 2009, Leave the name Holden with some dignity for Australian history , even though GM took it over in the 1930`s it was an Adelaide company and a family owned business.

  • Igomi Watabi

    correct on (a), incorrect on (b)

  • Jason

    We like football, meat pies, kangaroos and Hyundai cars……

  • Darren1968

    I have always been a Holden man and have been since a child with Dad having a HR then a range of Kingswoods and my first car was a LJ Torana, There is one thing that I will not do and that is buying a Holden that is made in Thailand or South Korea. I will be changing my choice of car to Ford with the new Ford Mustang being released in Australia in 2015. If GM imports cars from the US as Chevrolets then I would still support and buy General Motors products but definitely not Holden branded cars from Thailand and South Korea, that is sacralism.

  • R. Miller

    So what if they lose their badge. The REST of the world uses the Chevy Badge and don’t rename obvious car Models that have been sold globally as something else for the previous 20 years. However Holden loves to change a few minor details, then they can write made for AUstralian Conditions… Comeon what conditions are diffrent from any City in Australia from most of the rest of the world. As a Canadian how lived in Australia for 2 years attitude towards Globalization or as they put it “Americanization” North American English has been the Standard for all foreign students and corporations merging, Australian’s dont even speak Englis in half their vocabulary, if it isnt shortend like you were speaking to a baby its some other made up name and if no one else doesn’t have a clue what their saying. They try and make them know it. What Stuns me is Australian’s criticize American’s all the time yet, to anyone else they are humble. The arrogance of many Australian’s edit media to make them look bad when I have never seen such terrible geography as a generalization. You would know know how many Australian’s think Toronto is in the US, and to some young guys correcting them its Canada “same thing” If you don’t learn to fit in with a Globalized world apart from your distance from everywhere and all your natural resources they are taken from public land and given major corporation’s who expat 99% of it and brag about how its gong to Communist China, who pay penny’s on the dollar for natural gas and Australia’s don’t even get a Subsidization themselves and so many housing have heating that just wouldn’t be taken seriously in the US Canada or Europe as its so bad, mainly because of the high natural Gas Prices and for a hot nation Central Air-conditioning is too expensive to run, there’s most likely more homes in Toronto Canada with Central A/C than all of Australia because they what years ago seemed like an nice place to live has a right winged government creating more taxes than any of the left would think about doing. Soon people making over $180,000 which sounds high but it doesn’t go far down their, will be taxed 53% plus a 2% medicare levy or 55%, if that’s not redistribution of wealth without the perks the Europeans get, its collected to enlarge government and take from hard working professionals and give more to 16yo girls who have 5 kids to collect income and these women aren’t what you would at all call role models rather uneducated, rough, substance abusing women who try to cash in food benefits for their children for liquor. They couldn’t make it in the real world, they would just fit right in with the junkies on the street, those children whom will copy the same behavior i feel so sorry for before they fall down that road. God Bless Democracy