MINI is set to unveil the world’s fastest small premium cabriolet – that’s quite a niche – with the debut of its new John Cooper Works Convertible at the Geneva motor show.

Featuring the same high-performance modifications as its hatch sibling, the JCW Cabriolet is also powered by a 1.6-litre twin scroll-turbocharged petrol engine.

This little engine produces 157kW of power and 260Nm, with an additional 20Nm available through the overboost function.

2009 MINI John Cooper Works Cabriolet

Performance is slightly down in the Cabriolet, with zero to 100km/h taking 6.9 seconds which is 0.4 seconds slower than the hatch.

Jürgen Hedrich, MINI Plant Oxford’s new Managing Director, said: “The launch of the new MINI John Cooper Works Convertible is incredibly important as it signifies that our complete model line-up is now back in production across MINI’s UK production facilities.”

Fuel consumption has also slightly increased to 5.9-litres per 100kms, although this is still incredibly frugal for an engine which manages almost 100kW per litre.

2009 MINI John Cooper Works Cabriolet

Along with the power boost, the JCW Cabriolet features a bespoke Alcantara steering wheel, sport seats, John Cooper Works floor mats and glossy piano black interior.

The speedometer is also unique to the JCW variants, running up to over 250km/h to cater for the car’s higher top speed.

A Sport button has been added on the gear stick in true Italian Job style which activates a bespoke engine control map producing boost earlier in the rev range and sharpening steering and throttle response.

2009 MINI John Cooper Works Cabriolet

Unique lightweight 17-inch wheels shod with run-flat tyres frame a new Brembo brake calliper package with extra-large rotors.

A raft of chassis technologies have also been included and adapted for the JCW Cabriolet’s performance intentions, featuring ABS, EBD, CBC Cornering Brake Control, EDLC Electronic Differential Lock Control, DSC incorporating Hill Assist and DTC Dynamic Traction Control.

2009 MINI John Cooper Works Cabriolet

The car’s Electronic Differential Lock Control works when the car is accelerating hard out of corners or tight bends where it electronically slows the spinning inside wheel to enhance grip and ensure that all available power is transferred to the road through the wheel with greatest traction.

Australian pricing and availability are yet to be announced.




  • Alex

    I like that a lot and it is a bit more manly than the other two Mini Convertibles. Apparently the convertible is great so this probably will be too. I read a review for the S Convertible that said that it is more competition for the MX5 now rather than the 1 Series and A3 convertibles. I would prefer the hatch though.

  • Novax

    no you have got to be kidding me. 5.9L/100km? Is this a diesel?

    The standard mini S is 7.1L/100km if I’m not mistaken.

  • http://minicoopertuning.blogspot.com/ mini cooper tuning

    It looks like the Mini E will definitely not disappoint. The car featured a powerful motor getting about 204 horsepower and offering decent acceleration from 0 to 60 in about 8.5 seconds. The top speed is slow for those looking to take this baby on the autobahn, but at 95 mph, it will be just fine for American roads. Here is the real surprise, with a full battery charge, the Mini E can get a fantastic 150 miles, which is much more that practically any other electric plug in is expected to get.