2009 Honda Accord Euro Review

Current Pricing Not Available

2009 Honda Accord Euro Review & Road Test

A feeling of refinement that is very hard to rival

Pleasing performance & economy; excellent value; sporty look & feel
Lower rearward visibility; poor rural in-glass antenna reception

CarAdvice Rating:

There’s almost nothing I don’t enjoy about the Euro. The looks are modern, angular and fresh but not in a way that will date rapidly.

Clean lines, high shoulders and an upright rear, although common enough, come together with all the right proportions no matter the angle from which the car is viewed.

As well, a lot of thought seems to have gone in to the design, which is something I’ve come to expect from Honda in general, further proving the Euro’s worth in the value for money stakes.

Inside, the comfortable driving position of the Euro’s cockpit feels slightly sporty, which compliments the car’s on road abilities nicely, and with all functionality falling readily to hand, your involvement in the drive can be assured – and enjoyed.

The front seats are of a good size and are very supportive without being tight. Adjustment is by manual control in the base model and offers lumbar support for the driver.

While proportions are generous up front, rear leg room is a little compromised if the front seat passengers are above average height, so if you’re a taller family, taking the kids along on a test drive is strongly advised.

Accord Euro also offers a generous standard feature list, considering the base model’s standing, which includes dual-zone climate control, remote central locking, cruise control, chilled centre console, power windows (all auto up/down), power heated mirrors, height adjustable headlamps, tilt/slide steering wheel and 17-inch alloy wheels.

As well, Honda’s premium audio system with MP3 and WMA compatible six-CD tuner and auxiliary input jack is an excellent unit with great clarity of tone, ample bass (thanks to a parcel shelf mounted sub-woofer) and adequate volume. It also comes equipped with steering wheel mounted controls as standard.

Road holding is above average for the class, and although overly enthusiastic driving will see a hint of understeer creep in to the equation, normal country touring is very pleasant, generally enjoyable and surprisingly comfortable given the more sporty ride Euro offers over the larger, standard Accord.

Next Page...

There is a touch of road noise evident from the tyres on coarse chip roads though I didn’t find it as bad as that of the Euro Luxury with its 18-inch low profile tyres, food for though if you’ll be travelling on such roads often.

The 148kW, four-cylinder engine boasts 234Nm of torque from 4300rpm (in manual format - 230Nm for automatic variants) which although hardly ground pounding is certainly adequate for the size and intended purpose of the vehicle.

Power delivery is smooth and the six-speed manual very refined though sharper in response once Honda’s i-VTEC (variable valve timing) kicks in meaning down shifts and more revs equals a happier response. I'd also comment at this point that the manual does indeed feel more punchy than the automatic variant already tested.

Similarly, highway or around town cruising in higher gears will afford excellent fuel economy from the 2.4-litre engine, which, although has a preference for 95RON or higher petrol, will reward you with excellent fuel economy – all up, my week returned 9.4 litres per 100km with the majority of my driving in urban areas.

Steering feel is well balanced and feedback weighting is correct for the overall intent of the car. The turning circle of 11.0 metres is exactly class leading, but still offers a decent ease of manoeuvrability when parking.

Stopping comes compliments of discs all-round and with ABS, EBA and EBD as standard, the confidence offered under brakes is impressive. The 17-inch alloy wheels come standard with sticky Yokohama tyres adding to the grippy feel underfoot, all of which manages to halt the 1525kg (tare) Euro from 80km/h in just over 26 metres.

Standard ESP with Traction Control, front, side and curtain airbags and a four-star ANCAP crash rating complete the deal for safety features that again, is above average considering the price tag.

The boot is cavernous at 467-litres and can be extended further with one-touch 60:40 split fold rear seats. If that’s not enough, you can option Euro with a 1200kg (braked) tow kit.

If there had to be a downside to the Euro - and this is being very picky - it's that the lower rearward visibility is compromised by the car's rake ( we suggest optioning rear parking sensors) and that the in-glass radio antenna isn't exactly crystal clear when you're out of town.

I'd also have preferred fewer speedometer increments to allow easier sighting as there is no purpose in having it marked to 260km/h when the car tops out at around 227km/h - but again, I'm being very picky as this car is seriously hard to fault.

Euro is a great size car that is incredibly generous in appointment for the price. It’s comfortable and generally quiet, looks fantastic both inside and out and offers a feel of refinement from its drive that is very hard to rival within the category.

CarAdvice Overall Rating:
How does it Drive:
How does it Look:
How does it Go: