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The 2012 Australian new car sales figures in total are listed below with a segment breakdown following.

1 Toyota 218,176
2 Holden 114,665
3 Mazda 103,886
4 Hyundai 91,536
5 Ford 90,408
6 Nissan 79,747
7 Mitsubishi 58,868
8 Volkswagen 54,835
9 Subaru 40,189
10 Honda 35,812
11 Kia 30,758
12 Suzuki 24,057
13 Mercedes-Benz 22,397
14 BMW 18,413
15 Jeep 18,014
16 Audi 14,535
17 Great Wall 11,006
18 Land Rover 7,929
19 Isuzu Ute 7,782
20 Lexus 6,839
21 Volvo 5,375
22 Peugeot 5,071
23 Renault 5,011
24 Skoda 3,502
25 MINI 2,394
26 Dodge 2,028
27 Citroen 1,702
28 Ssangyong 1,590
29 Fiat 1,432
30 Porsche 1,373
31 Chrysler 1,359
32 Chery 1,133
33 Proton 1,005
34 Alfa Romeo 906
35 Jaguar 786
36 Opel 541
37 Smart 142
38 Maserati 124
39 Ferrari 98
40 Aston Martin 94
41 Infiniti 85
42 Lotus 69
43 Bentley 65
44 Lamborghini 41
45 Saab 27
46 McLaren 23
47 Rolls-Royce 22
48 Morgan 16
49 Caterham 3
50 Hummer 0

(units sold – market share)

2012 Light Car Segment Winners:

  1. Toyota Yaris (18,808 – 13.9%)
  2. Mazda2 (17,574 – 13%)
  3. Hyundai i20 (13,339 – 9.9%)

Small Car Segment Winners:

  1. Mazda3 (44,128 – 18.3%)
  2. Toyota Corolla (38,799 – 16.1%)
  3. Holden Cruze (29,161 – 12.1%)

Medium Car Segment Winners:

  1. Toyota Camry (27,230 – 39.6%)
  2. Mercedes-Benz C-Class (6,676 – 35.5% of medium car segment over 60k)
  3. Mazda6 (6,558 – 9.5%)

Large Car Segment Winners:

  1. Holden Commodore (30,532 – 52.3%)
  2. Ford Falcon (14,036 – 24%)
  3. Toyota Aurion (9,074 – 15.5%

Upper Large Car Segment Winners:

  1. Holden Caprice (1,460 – 54.8% of upper large under 100k)
  2. Chrysler 300 (1,206  – 45.2% of upper large under 100k)
  3. BMW 7 Series (138 – 24.3% of upper large over 100k)

People Mover Segment Winners:

  1. Kia Carnival (3,676 – 34.6%)
  2. Hyundai iMax (1,733 – 16.3%)
  3. Honda Odyssey (1,554 – 14.6%)

Sports Segment Winners:

  1. Hyundai Veloster (4,107 – 25.9%)
  2. Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupe (2,336 – 14.8%)
  3. Toyota 86 (2,047 – 12.9%)

Supercars (200k+) Segment Winners:

  1. Porsche 911 (230 units – 22.1%)
  2. BMW 6 Series (222 – 21.3%)
  3. Maserati (124 – 11.9%)

SUV Small Segment Winners:

  1. Nissan Dualis (13,141 – 23%)
  2. Hyundai ix35 (11,469 – 20%)
  3. Subaru XV (9,908 – 17.3%)

SUV Medium Segment Winners:

  1. Nissan X-Trail (16,066 – 16.2%)
  2. Mazda CX-5 (15,861 – 17%)
  3. Toyota RAV4 (14,651 – 14.8%)

SUV Large Segment Winners:

  1. Toyota Prado (17,045 – 16.6%)
  2. Ford Territory (14,646 – 14.2%)
  3. Toyota Kluger (13,239 – 12.9%)

SUV Upper Large Segment Winners:

  1. Toyota Landcruiser Wagon (10,829 – 77.2%)
  2. Nissan Patrol Wagon (3,207 – 22.8%)

Pickup 4×2 Segment Winners

  1. Toyota Hilux 4×4 (11,379 – 23.1%)
  2. Holden Utility 4×2 (7,925 – 16.1%)
  3. Ford Falcon Ute 4×2 (5,733 – 11.6%)

Pickup 4×4 Segment Winners

  1. Toyota Hilux 4×4 (29,267 – 23.5%)
  2. Nissan Navara 4×4 (23,940 – 19.2%)
  3. Mitsubishi Triton 4×4 (13,054 – 10.5%)



  • Doctor

    Toyota has outsold both Holden and Mazda. Imagine what Electrolux could do if it put wheels on its appliances!

    • Nurse

      Perhaps it would give you some fresh material and you wouldn’t have to beat that dead horse of a joke anymore…

    • Sydlocal

       Toyota outsold all other manufacturers, not just Holden and Mazda. Unless you meant Holden and Mazda combined?

    • Brett

      What magazines need to help them sell copy is not what Australians want when we buy cars – the two are not related.

  • $29896495

    Here we go again, All cars in the small class are medium cars. All cars in the medium class are large cars. Mercedes seems out of place, luxury wouldn’t you say? Chrysler 300 should be with Falcon/Commodore – Aurion and Camry should be considered one. The Sports is just mind boggling as is upper large.

    Interesting to see, Opel having sold as many as they did in such a short time. Can’t all be dealer cars. That’s almost half of Chrysler who had a full year. next year should be interesting for them.
    Porsche moved a lot of cars. Poor old Ford number 5, behind Hyundai what can you say to that?

    • Ds

      Opel had a killer few months, ahead of Skoda in only 4 months.

      • Tex

        December was a poor result for Skoda indeed.

        Will be interesting to see what happens with them. Matthew Weisner has now finished up with the company, and a replacement Director still hasn’t been appointed.

        He did make it one of the fastest growing brands in the last 6 years, but Renault and Opel seem to be putting on a decent attack.

    • Pal

       Actually Chrysler only had only a handful of Voyagers to sell most of the year. It was only until about August the 300′s were being sold . Not a bad debut for Opal though

      • Pal

         Opel

  • Browneye69

    Infiniti sales are still really bad, only 85 cars. They may only be new on the market but 85 sales seems very poor to me.

    • Sam

      No one knows about them

    • Martin

      The value equation is pretty poor if you asked me. Asking Australians to drop upwards on 90 grand on a car that is relatively unknown is a pretty risky proposition. Granted you will lose money on the car, but how much is the question.

  • Zaccy16

    some segments are not correct in my opnion

  • Brett

    Is there actual dimensions that determine the categories? Or is it all relative to what Falcon/Commodore are? 

    • $29896495

      Sure there are 1800 and 1800 plus wide considered large, 1690 – 1750 usually considered medium. 1600 – 1660 small, below 1600 micro (whether it’s called a city car or what ever).

      The sizes are obviously a product of the main car producing centres, Japan, US, and Europe. Japan mandates that cars cars produced for that country should not be wider than 1690, due to congestion and the width of streets. You might notice that the larger Japanese cars are not made there for Japanese consumption except in these days in the high cost high tax cars. Though they have a dispensation to go slightly above 1700 now. It’s still the exception and not the rule.

      US has obviously, Small, Compact and Large. Small was generally foreign for them. Compact was in the old days things like the original Falcon and Mustang just so you have a reference point. For them Compact was and is anything  UNDER 72 inches or 6 ft or 1800 mm. Large is anything above. 

      Length can be arbitrary. 3 to 3.5 metres, generally small, 3.5 to 4.5 for medium or compact and above 4.5 for large. There are exceptions with width being the main criteria. For example in the US the AMC Gremlin and then the Pacer – the latter known as the only BIG small car due to it’s width and shortness.

      Just to help a bit more an original Falcon was around the same size as a Kruze or original Opel Commodore, though because the Kruze design and standing much taller it gives the optical illusion of being narrower.

  • Suraj

    Can anyone have any idea about Mahindra’s XUV 500 sales numbers??

    • Mike2

      I believe sales figures are supplied by manufacturers and importers, not the registration authorities. As far as I know, Mahindra has never supplied figures to VFACTS. Neither does Geely and neither did Ssangyong until a few years ago. You would have to contact the importer and ask.

      • Suraj

        Hey..
        Thanks a lot for reply.

        But it would be great if you can name the importer or give me the contact details if you can.

        As i am from India and write for one online mag, it would be great know this piece of information.

        Thanks in advance.