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The 2013 BMW M6 Coupe and Convertible have been launched in Australia with a starting price of $292,500 for the coupe and $308,500 for the convertible.

The range topping 6 Series is powered by the same engine as found in the M5, a TwinPower Turbo V8 (two twin-scroll turbochargers) with 412kW of power and 680Nm of torque coupled to an M seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. BMW says the powerplant’s characteristics make it the most responsive turbocharged engine in any production car around the world. It’s also the most powerful engine ever fitted to a BMW production car.

Despite the enormous power and torque output, the M6 Coupe’s fuel usage is just 9.9 litres per 100km while the convertible consumes 10.3L/100km. This represents an improvement of more than 30 per cent over the previous-generation V10-powered M6, which found 160 Australian buyers over its lifetime.

Better still, the new M6 is also quicker than its predecessor. The 0-100km/h times are now down to just 4.2 seconds for the coupe and 4.3secs for the convertible, which puts it in a league of cars like the Aston Martin DBS.

The M6 is equipped with BMW’s active M differential, which is equipped with an electric motor and links to the car’s stability and traction control functions, which helps the system better realise which rear wheel is losing traction before a standard differential could act (as it takes input from stability control and yaw sensors).

Being the top of the range 6 Series, the BMW M6 gets all the bells and whistles as standard equipment. This includes M-specific front and rear axle kinematics, dynamic damper control (without the Comfort+ mode to save weight) as well as M hydraulic rack-and-pinion steering.

M compound brakes (400mm front and 396mm rear) with six piston calipers are standard equipment with M carbon ceramic brakes available as an option from next year (for $20,000-plus) if you intend to track your M6 on a regular basis.

If you can’t tell from its sound, the BMW M6 can be spotted from the outside thanks to its massive quad exhaust pipes, unique double-slated kidney grille, aerodynamic aids and an M body kit. It also happens to be 4mm shorter in its wheelbase, and is 16mm lower and 25mm wider than the regular 6 Series.

Inside the M steering wheel with two customisable M buttons sets the tone for a full-leather cabin with carbonfibre trim through the centre console. The 10.2-inch (longer than a full-size iPad) screen is equipped with the latest version of iDrive and is now simpler than ever to use.

For the BMW M6 Coupe, a carbonfibre roof is offered, as has been the case on the M3 in the past. BMW says it is for more than just looks, but to reduce the weight on top of the car (19.5kg less compared with the glass roof on the BMW 650i coupe) for improved performance.

BMW has applied a number of its Efficient Dynamics technologies to the M6, include brake energy regeneration and auto stop-start.

Standard features include 20-inch M double-spoke wheels, LED headlights, head-up display, premium audio system, internet connectivity, lane change and departure warning systems, rear-view camera with surround view, seat heating and ventilation and pretty much anything else that is available as an option on the 6 Series.

BMW Australia expects to sell 30 M6 coupes and convertibles for the rest of 2012 and around 65 in the 2013.

Stay tuned for CarAdvice’s first drive review of the BMW M6 Coupe and Convertible, coming soon.




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