2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review

2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel Road Test

This hybrid-esque, fuel efficient monster ticks all the boxes.

Model Tested:

  • 2008 Toyota LandCruiser GXL Turbo Diesel 6-speed automatic – $81,328

Options:

  • None fitted.

Amazing fuel economy; interior room; towing ability; off-road capability
Lack of features; price; interior/exterior design

CarAdvice Rating:

2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review
2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review

- by Paul Maric

At a time when fossil fuel reserves are dwindling and traffic congestion is increasing, it’s anyone’s guess why four-wheel-drives are still popular amongst the masses.

One of the most popular serious 4WDs is the Toyota LandCruiser. With a steady history in Australia, the LandCruiser is renowned for its durability, versatility and ease of operation.

So I saddled up in the GXL, turbo-diesel variant to see if there was any logic to the purchase of such a massive 4WD.

Throw in a bit of mud-flinging out in the bush, a little bit of city driving and a stint of mountain driving and you have yourself a fully fledged road test.

2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review
2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review
2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review

Toyota has thumbed its nose at the public in something of show of corporate arrogance and prices have increased sizeably from the previous generation LandCruiser, while features have decreased.

It’s Toyota’s belief that people who want to buy the LandCruiser will do so, regardless of its price.

That’s why it astounded me somewhat to see very little in the way of features in the GXL model. Despite the face that it’s a base model, it really did lack common features you would find in other $80,000+ 4WDs.

However, I bit my tongue and went on, in the hope of seeing what the LandCruiser was really about.

Climbing into the ‘Cruiser is a bit of fun, with the big step up from terra firma being eased by grab handles. Once onboard, a rather pretentious starter button is used to fire up the behemoth.

Under the bonnet lies 4.5-litres of twin-turbocharged V8 diesel engine. Producing a staggering 650Nm of torque and 195kW of power, you would expect the LandCruiser to chew through fuel. Not quite.

2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review
2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review
2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review

In fact, I was astounded at how little fuel it actually used. Although there was no trip computer in the base model, I calculated the fuel use to be just under 10.0 litres per 100km – amazing.

Next Page…

Towing is also taken care of courtesy of a 3.5-tonne towing capacity. Considering the torque, you could be towing a small house and it would be hard to notice the difference in pulling power.

The new LandCruiser is also quite driveable for such a large 4WD. It will be the first off the lights when lined up next to pretty much anything. Even with a full load of eight people on board, the LandCruiser moves along briskly with little hesitation.

Brakes are an important factor on a rig this size and you will be pleased to hear that Toyota has covered this aspect. Measuring 340mm at the front and 320mm at the rear, the brakes pull up the LandCruiser in remarkable fashion.

2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review
2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review
2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review
2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review

Jump on the anchors and the front end tips forward, bringing the meaty Toyota to a halt in no time.

As you would expect, corners are met with distaste. There is a considerable amount of body roll and sudden changes of direction are certainly not recommended! That goes without saying though in a vehicle this size.

Off the beaten track, the LandCruiser can’t be beaten. With dedicated 4WD and a myriad of gizmos and gadgets, there is little stopping this 2.7-tonne monster when it comes to climbing muddy hills and tackling river crossings.

The petrol variant gets a ‘Crawl’ feature, which works both in ascent and descent. Crawl allows the vehicle to climb a grade at three different speeds. The computer manages the traction control to allow maximum grip and limited slip.

Although the diesel variant doesn’t get Crawl, it does receive Downhill Assist Control (DAC), which modulates the ABS to bring the LandCruiser down a hill in an orderly fashion.

The interior is a bit of a mixed bag. It is well built and feels sturdy, but is covered with plastic and looks extremely dated – especially the radio fascia! It looks as though it was sourced from the first iteration of the much maligned Avalon.

There were also a few build issues with the airbag surround. The front curtain airbag cover was loose and could easily be pulled back to expose the pyrotechnics – not very pleasing upon first inspection.

2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review
2008 Toyota LandCruiser GLX Turbo Diesel review

Hauling luggage and people is the LandCruiser’s forte though. With an ability to seat eight people , plus ample luggage space, it’s not hard to see why this Toyota is so versatile and during the loan, I loaded eight adults in the car. It was bit hard for the third row of passengers to get in and out, but once settled they were quite comfortable.

The LandCruiser range comes in three variants, the GXL, VX and Sahara. Pricing ranges from $70,735 for the V8 petrol GXL, right up to $107,809 for the turbo-diesel Sahara.

The model tested by CarAdvice retails at $81,328 and each model carries a $10,593 premium for the diesel engine.

Although the price difference is massive just for the engine, it is worth every cent. It is extremely superior to the V8 petrol version, which – as you can imagine – goes through a tremendous amount of fuel.

Despite the shortfalls in features and the higher price, the LandCruiser Series 200 is a good purchase for those after a serious 4WD that offers serious grunt and bucket loads of room.

Just bypass the base model though, it really feels quite cheap when you consider the asking price. Your best bet is to stretch to either the VX or Sahara model.

CarAdvice Overall Rating:
How does it Drive:
How does it Look:
How does it Go:

 

Specifications:

  • Engine: 4461cc V8
  • Power: 195kW @ 3400rpm
  • Torque: 650Nm @ 1600rpm
  • Induction: Twin turbocharged
  • Transmission: Six-speed automatic
  • Differential/Driven Wheels: All-wheel-drive
  • Brakes: ABS with BA
  • Top Speed: N/A
  • 0-100km/h: N/A
  • 0-400m: N/A
  • CO2 Emissions: N/A
  • Fuel Consumption: 10.3L/100km
  • Fuel Tank Capacity: 93-litres
  • Fuel Type: Diesel
  • ANCAP Rating: N/A
  • Airbags: 10 airbags
  • Safety: ESP with TC
  • Spare Wheel: Full size
  • Tow Capacity: 3.5-tonne
  • Turning Circle: 11.8-metres
  • Warranty: 3-years/100,000km
  • Weight: 2720kg
  • Wheels/tyres: 17-inch, 285/65 R17



  • pg

    $100,000 for a Toyota
    tell em they’re dreamin

  • Devil666

    I’ve gotta say for a four point five litre Twin Turbo V8 diesel, 650 newts is less that I was expecting. If Hyundai and Benz can pull around 500 newts from 2.2 single turbo 4 cyl units, and Audi Benz and BMW have the 3.0 single turbo sixes that all run about 500 newts (that have all been around for quite some time now) and BMW also has that delicious 35d twin turbo six that they can squeeze 580nm from…. It just makes this engine with its extra displacement and cylinders seem old tech before its even reached the market. Sure it’s a lot of torque, but I was expecting a lot more. Still can’t go past it in terms of off road ability though.

    • Nat

      I think you will find this engine is derated so to ensure it lasts and performs for a long time where as the bmw and european diesels are in a very high state of tune and there fore quite regularly need turbo changes and various other engine components as they are wound up high, but with just a small chip this engine can be taken to 230kw and 780nm which would really make it go better

  • Myke

    Also it is a $10k premium over the V8 petrol. Toyota really enjoy overcharging.

  • Dlr1

    Devil666, its not all just about the numbers you can pull from any displacement, its also about the driveability. It develops 650 Nm at 1600 rpm, and a significant amount of torque at lower engine speeds. Whats the point of having a 2.7 tonne vehicle that struggles to get moving before the turbo reaches full boost, especially when you are offroad. Read the offroad review of the TDi Tiguan. Sure, Toyota probably could have tuned it differently, but whats the point of more torque up high if its gutless at 1500rpm?

  • anthonii

    pg Says:
    $100,000 for a Toyota

    What about the $150,000 Comodore of recent?

  • Austin

    well i got to this after catching up on a month’s worth of car advice and i’m yet again my own anti-spam word :) it’s an interesting article. I have to agree that the interior fit/finish/design is not its forte and they are over charging like a wounded bull, however toyota are also right that people (read- companies) who buy landcruiser wagons will continue to buy landcruiser wagons. I’ve only ever driven one privately owned wagon, most of the ones I’ve driven have been company cars on mine sites and for belting around haul roads, rough tracks, up steep dozer tracks and generally using them for work rather than pleasure they have been fine. The suspension seems decent, mountains of torqe from the diesels and they don’t balk at rough terrain.

    Really I think the thing that sets them apart from a number of other vehicles in this class is that they don’t have any gripes that stop you working effectively, I find patrols tend to be a bit weak and don’t feel as sure footed, hiluxes can struggle with weight and cab chassis cruisers can be rough for long trips (a few hundred k +), but a poor interior and high price don’t worry the people using them day to day out in the dust when others are paying the bills. While the people paying the bills find them easy to get on lease, easy to get locally serviced and don’t get a mountain of complaints about them. Just my take on why they’ll continue to be a fleet vehicle of choice for mining/quarrying/heavy industry for managers/engineers etc.

  • http://www.geardiary.com Mitchell Oke

    Apples and oranges anthonii, The W427 is supposed to be a limited edition collectors model, this isn’t.

    Sure it may have a fabulous engine and amazing carrying and towing capacity, but $80000 is simply staggering for a vehicle that bland and lacks many features much cheaper (and older) cars would think of as standard.

    Looks like Toyota are riding their good name a little too much.

  • Frontman

    10k for the diesel variant, when they know full well that NO Sane person would bother with the petrol becuase it drinks better than Bob Hawke! That’s smart marketing for you. Especially when you throw in what’s missing in the standard trim…………. Some people crow about Toyota being smart bussiness people and making fistfuls of money!!! I reckon that’s just short of Piracy.
    Ok the Motor is supposed to be “cutting Edge” but isn’t their V8 Petrol also cutting edge? or are they flogging us a dud?
    As for the mine vehicles and the Government ones, rest assured they are paying nowhere near that money.
    Sorry Toyota but it has got to stop somewhere!!!!!!

  • trackdaze

    Didn’t happen to notice if it changed into sixth? or if the oil level dropped on the dipstick?

    So they introduced this motor (albiet with only one turbo) in the 70 series with no real price increase over the 6cyl TD. Yet somehow in the 200 series its worth ten grand more than a full feature (DOHC,VVT etc )petrol.

  • Twilight

    the ‘GLX’ doesn’t even have a leather bound steering wheen or handbrake (like the old one), and not even a trip computer!!!! what a shame…

    i prefer this ones looks to the previous gen, but lack of features is a really big dissappointment.

  • Falcodore

    Is the dust sealing as good (re: bad) as the Toy….er sorry, Lexus they tested on TGA?

  • greenroom

    Give me my old FJ55 back anytime.. Oh what a beating…

  • RoFlmaTiC

    The diesel also comes with a better gearbox, but 10k is still very expensive.

    Agree with the other sentiments too, for that sort of money, youd hope there would be more creature comforts.

  • http://deleted Alex

    It’s very ugly, but then it’s not supposed to be fashionable. I always had some respect for a Land Cruiser but there is something very soft about this one somehow. I could never take one over a Range Rover or a Discovery especially when a Discovery with way more features and standard equipment, plus much better on road ability, better ride, better everything costs about $20,000 less. What was the dust situation like? My friends brother got a 200 Series and he has the dust problem but not only that, a lot dust got into the engine and it wouldn’t start! He seriously considering replacing it with a Land Rover or a Touraeg.

  • singleton

    i like our old LandCruiser so much better. it looks somthing put big dings in the doors. even the guy in the toyota shop at deniliquin say’s the older model looks better. so glad we didnt deciced to get the new one. i agree with alex to soft and lack less

  • Ben

    $10 000 for the diesel?
    10.3 l/100 km for the diesel and 14.5 l/100 km for the petrol, but petrol is nor 35+ cpl cheaper, so at today’s prices it’ll take 1.1 million km to recoup your initial outlay (too bad if you used finance or leased the thing, ’cause you’ll never make up the difference).

    Ben.

  • RoFlmaTiC

    I don’t think you buy the diesel for the money savings Ben, but rather for the better driving dynamics all that torque on tap.

  • trackdaze

    I’ve heard contrary info on the fuel economy from outside those publications that carry toyota infomercial status. Maybe its a lotto thing whether you get one that uses too much fuel or too much oil.

    I can attest the the previous 6td being very economical. It did 12/100 all day every day. Some of the 4cyl SUV’s would stuggle sometimes to do better.

    Yep that’ll make the greenies spray their rainforest certified latte’s all over their friends tie die smocks. It seems you can have your 2.5tonne behemoth without indirectly clubbing baby fur seals afterall.

  • JEYKL & HYDE

    i’m told that there is a v6 turbo diesel nearly sorted for the nissan patrol that has similar output to the toyota diesel.should be interesting when it happens,when you can by a auto st-l for high fifties.more features,and enough spare coin for a small car for the son or daughter

  • Gibbo

    Id sooner spend less than 80 grand and get a late model 100 series Sahara turbo diesel with all the bells and whistles.

  • http://deleted Alex

    Trackdaze, you do realize it’s Co2 thats causing environmental problems, not fuel economy right?

  • Richo

    Toyota made a high water mark with their 80 series landcruiser, a mark they have never been able to reach again…

  • Richo

    Alex – the less fuel you burn, the less Co2 is created.. fairly simple concept mate!

  • trackdaze

    Alex,

    I think the rule is x=2.3y for petrol, x=2.7y for diesel or x=.2b

    where x = litres y = co2 in kg’s and b = baby fur seals.

    Not to worry K-Rudds handout for “special people” is less than a month away.

  • Realcars

    Australia is truely the lucky country. Where else can struggling farmers spend close on 100k for a runabout and still receive Family Tax benefit A & B plus numerous other tax payer funded benefits.LOL.

  • Wheelnut

    Anthoniiii there are those in the industry who believe that the $150K HSV W427 is destined to become a collectors item in the future – although they doubt or any of the modern aussie muscle/performance cars will ever reach the $800k+ prices like the old HK Monaros and XY GT-HO Falcons have..

    Whereas I doubt that the Landcruiser could or would ever be considered as a Classic let alone a Collectable Car because the Landcruiser [like most Toyotas] doesn’t arouse the passion and emotion in Car Enthusiasts like the HSVs FPVs Monaros and GTs etc do

  • Realcars

    i HAD A PETROL 80 SERIES GXL WITH THE 4.5 TWIN CAM.

    If that was the high water mark then gawd help the rest.LOL.

    Clunk,Whirr,Clunk.LOL

  • Wheelnut

    Proof of this is the fact the first lot of HSV 427s [ which HSV are expected to build before the end of the year] sold out as soon as they were released and orders for the remainder stretch well into next year..almost up until April

    Which I suspect is longer than the waiting list for a Landcruiser Prado Hilux Kluger Rav4 Aurion Corolla and Yaris combined

  • Realcars

    Clunk,Thud,Whir,Clunk,Thud,Whir me going through the gears in the 8O series,LOL

    If u enjoy driving trucks buy a cruiser.

  • D

    Don’t mean to be fussy, but it’s GXL, not GLX. You even use GXL sometimes in the article.

    Toyota has used the GXL designation since least the 60-series.

  • http://deleted Alex

    I won’t pretend I know all that much about Co2 and petrol and so on but what I will say (and this is more a question than a statement) if Co2 output is to do with how much fuel you burn, how can you have two cars that have the exact same fuel economy but one puts out more Co2 than the other? For instance, the BMW 118d and the Hyundai Getz 1.5 CRTD officially both get 62.8 MPG, but the Hyundai puts out 130 grams of Co2 per kilometer and the BMW puts out 119 grams of Co2 per kilometer – could someone please explain? (and give it to me in english :)

  • O

    suree the GXL isnt eactly bang for ur buck.but the saharha isfor 100k you get 4 zone aircon intergrated sat nav, 28 airvents leather adn not to mention the amazing tech that is standard on the petrol but not diesel

  • VW Freak

    C’mon CA, get it right!

    Title: “GXL”, not “GLX”.
    Specs: those are VX or Sahara specs
    The thing was rolly-polly beacuase you didn’t get a model to test with KDSS! Try testing one with KDSS and then let us know how you feel it handles through corners.

    Spec levels are a joke, no seat height adjustment or lumbar on GXL, where’s the xenons and rain sensing wipers on the Sahara?

    Oh, an interesting point regarding the Sahara – Toyota in their wonderful wisdom have issued a “special” Sahara, less KDSS suspension and sunroof so you can score the extra fuel tank, which is deleted in VX and Sahara diesel models due to weight constraints. Bravo Toyota, great thinking.

    And as some have already mentioned, yes the diesels burn oil, yes the diesel never goes into 6th gear, plus drivetrain clunks, dust sealing problems, what else is there? You’ll need to do a LOT BETTER Toyota!!!

    • Nat

      Exactly i cannot believe the sahara doesnt have rain sensing wipers, auto headlights and doesnt even have xenons this is a $120k car what the hell, i want other cars but i like the long range tanks in the landcruiser and i also like that i wouldnt feel so bad about flogging the hell out of it where as a range rover or audi i would feel bad. I like the toyota service costs to tell me how they can service a diesel for $210 and bmw charges $900 what the heck

  • Gibbo

    Did any one catch the episode o Top Gear the other week when they went desert in some luxury 4WDs. Did you see how much dust was inside Charlie’s Luxus LX570 (200 series). If the $150 grand top of the range Lexus can’t keep dust out of the cabin then Id hate to see what the poverty pack GXL would be like… Pretty sad when it costs so much and the cabin isn’t even sealed properly.

  • Andrew M

    wheelnut,
    but people arent really buying the W427 with the words investment in mind.
    nor did people have investment in mind when the purchased GTHO’s from new,
    and nor will the people who buy these, all though these will return a great investment in reducing ones tax bill, because i dare say 100% of them purchased will end up on decline in value schedules.

    Yep its mega bucks with out real justification, but these are sold for a purpose. its like dissing a kenworth truck because its mega bucks for low comfort.

    Good to see it hasnt been mentioned that F Trucks set you back around the 100K mark………
    yet again another vehicle that is bought solely for purpose and not investment.
    (although im sure the F Truck owners that are selling at the moment are glad to see they can sell them for more than they paid)

    its still to be seen if a W427 will or will not return much in the way of appreciation.
    that $150,000 in the bank will return more each year than the W427 will achieve in growth.

    cars and investment is a bit of a WHAT THE i reckon

  • Wheelnut

    I realise that Andrew – anyone who buys anything as an investment is an idiot because it all depends on the market at the time..
    Sure the GT-HOs and Monaros sold for $800K a couple of months ago but now the prices are starting to fall back to something more reasonable like $100K – which is the same as a new Landcruiser.. which would you go for?

    Yet; My point was that a Limited Edition performance car like the W427 is more likely to become more collectible in the future [25 years or so] than a Landcruiser so is more which; should prices in the market sky-rocket again in the future justify the extra $50k

    However; they are 2 different cars built for 2 different purposes aimed at 2 different markets so any comparison is ridiculous

  • Andrew M

    i agree,
    “any comparison is ridiculous”
    so why did you compare???

  • Skybreak

    This Cruiser might retail at $80k+, but how much are the fleet discounts worth?

    The mining companies and other big buyers certainly aren’t paying $80k+ each.

  • trackdaze

    Andrew,

    The difference you state between the bmw & hyundai for c02 are faily minimal and would largely come down to the fuel they use (there are different cetane ratings for diesels) and how many fruit loops the head of marketing had the morning of the press release.

    Seriously, It could come down to how much exhaust recirc these two are running.

  • trackdaze

    Wont the mining companies be steering clear of the 200 & going for the 70′s? now that there is no standard model.

    Jekyl&Hyde had it right. All Nissan need to do to mop up all the right minded purchasers & the fleets is put an acceptable diesel in the patrol (even just a Variable geometry turbo on the existing motor) stability control for the fleets and charge less than the LCT and they will have trouble keeping up with demand.

  • FORD = KING OF THE MOUNTAIN

    Talk about a big ugly dust bowl whitegood, Toyo are fleet advertising master’s, mining companies and farmers sign on dotted line’s even before their landbruiser engine is started.

    Toyo will alway’s be uninspired dive >>> I mean drive..

  • Bret

    F=KOTM,
    Thanks for your opinion and worthwhile contribution??

    Interesting that this is only one(1) l/100km worse than a deisel Prado.

    CarAdvice, guys I think that you should quote ADR 81/01 figures in the specs first, the an “as tested” figure if you want.

  • LH

    exactly Pg :-)

  • http://Internode.on.net Peter

    CA – have you ever tried putting 8 people in a Landcruiser? My mate put his 4 kids (aged 4-15), wife, mother and himself in – had to shoehorn the people in then realised there was no room for the luggage. He sold the ‘Cruiser and bought a Multivan. Maybe it will fit 8 midgets, but that’s about it.
    I agree with Brett – use the standard ADR 81/01 always and add your tested results if you want.

  • Paul Maric

    Peter:

    Have you read the article? In particular the part where I mentioned loading 8 people in the vehicle.

    Also, the second page of the article includes a specifications section which features the ADR fuel consumption of 10.1-litres/100km.

  • Bret

    Paul,
    My assumption was that you put an “as tested” figure of 10.1 l/100km in the specs section, because the “official” figure is 10.3 l/100km.

  • Paul Maric

    Bret:

    Sorry, that’s a typo.

    In the article I mentioned returning a calculated figure of just under 10 per 100. The official figure is meant to be in the specifications.

  • Austin

    Alex,

    Output of any gases, including CO2 (carbon dioxide), from the combustion of a fuel depends on an enourmous range of factors such as %combustion, oxygen to fuel ratios, ignition temperature, fuel type/aditives/impurities, compression etc, and they all depend on each other as well. If you get poor combustion conditions you may actually see lower levels of CO2 but higher levels of CO (carbon monoxide) for example.
    As for the mention of the effects of C02 in the atmosphere, it is recognised as significantly less harmful (by weight) to the atmosphere than something like CO or CH4 (methane). This is why “CO2 equivalant” is often used, meaning all commonly recognised and significant “damaging” emission types- CO, CH4 etc are multiplied by relative factors to bring them to a level comparison field. If this is used the amount of CO2 may be equal in the emissions of different vehicles with different CO2 equivalant results.
    Though the actual extent of “damage” to the atmosphere causing “climate change” is just a topic that will be debated by everyone from scientists to politicians for a couple of years until they move on to something else to keep themselves in a job…

  • Tyson

    Its funny really,

    did anyone stop and wonder if they would ever sell a petrol one if they where the same price? The answer is no they wouldnt, The Car itself drives better than the 100 series ever did, and the techonology and time spent developing the enw platform has set it to be still the greatest 44×4 on the aus market, Sure you can buy other cars for less discovery etc etc however look what your disco is worth in 5 years compared to the trusty Toyota ;)

    I see it every day, I sell toyotas, people come in with there Patrols, Discoverys, Jeeps, Pajeros, and to be honest all of them are horrified when they find out how much there cars have depreciated. No where near that issue with a Toyota, mainly because people actually want to buy them ont he used car market ;)

  • CB

    Wheelnut Says:
    November 16th, 2008 at 5:53 pm
    “Anthoniiii there are those in the industry who believe that the $150K HSV W427 is destined to become a collectors item in the future – although they doubt or any of the modern aussie muscle/performance cars will ever reach the $800k+ prices like the old HK Monaros and XY GT-HO Falcons have..”

    Are you one of the deluded folk who really believe that? Should I bring up past HSV “destined to be classics” that you can pick up for the price of a camry these days?

    “Whereas I doubt that the Landcruiser could or would ever be considered as a Classic let alone a Collectable Car because the Landcruiser [like most Toyotas] doesn’t arouse the passion and emotion in Car Enthusiasts like the HSVs FPVs Monaros and GTs etc do”

    Actually, if you ask a 4wd enthusiast they may show just as much passion as a HSV or FPV enthusiast. You’re generalising again mate.

    FORD = KING OF THE MOUNTAIN Says:
    November 17th, 2008 at 1:24 pm
    “Talk about a big ugly dust bowl whitegood, Toyo are fleet advertising master’s, mining companies and farmers sign on dotted line’s even before their landbruiser engine is started.
    Toyo will alway’s be uninspired dive >>> I mean drive..”

    Fleet advertising masters? Say what you like about the corolla’s and camry’s of the world, but to call the new 200 series “a big ugly dust bowl whitegood” shows your bias and not your knowledge.

    They may be overpriced, but they are a super 4WD. Show me one Australian made 4WD that can cut it in the Pilbara or Kimberly… nope, didn’t think so…

  • LOLzors

    Australia is truly the lucky country. Where else can struggling farmers spend close on 100k for a runabout and still receive Family Tax benefit A & B plus numerous other tax payer funded benefits

  • http://www.caradvice.com.au/18898/2008-toyota-landcruiser-glx-turbo-diesel-review/2/ Hans

    Every time someone compares a Toyota with a General Motors Holden vehicle it turns out into a bloodbath (sigh)

    Why are we comparing a $100k 4WD with a $150k sedan anyway?

    General motors Holden might not even survive another couple of years. Look at the amount of cash their parent company is burning up. Same goes for Ford. If General Motors and Ford pack up local manufacturing then Toyota will follow suit.

  • Tomas79

    Wheelnut Says:
    “Whereas I doubt that the Landcruiser could or would ever be considered as a Classic let alone a Collectable Car because the Landcruiser [like most Toyotas] doesn’t arouse the passion and emotion in Car Enthusiasts like the HSVs FPVs Monaros and GTs etc do”

    Wheelnut, do you abuse drugs before you start typing up stuff up?
    A Landcruiser is a World Class Classic!! Monaro is a local bogan legend….Are you even aware how many different clubs there is around Australia, let lone the world, dedicated purely to HJ 40s?? And let me not even get started on the other models…. you call your self a car enthusiast?? More like a gullible GM Holden fan boy….

  • Tomas79

    Typo HJ40=FJ40…

  • Tyson

    Lol, no 200 series landcruiser will eve be a classic, there a mass produced 4wd that is brilliant at what it does, but in todays expendable society, you will never see one become a collectors item.

    Oh and for those complaining about it not going into 6th gear for the T/D, it wont go in until 120kph. Toyotas reasoning is that the car is marketed in other countrys not just Australia where cruising speeds are aproaching 200kph. Its an overdrive, if it changed at 100kph into 6th Toyota believed it wasnt nescesary as fuel economy is negligable at that speed and it puts un nescesarry wear and tear on torque converters and gear box due to holding the revs too low in the rev range.

    On the oil consumption note, Not one of my cusomers has had a motor pulled out as a result, and by 15000 km’s consumption had settled down and wasnt burning any more oil.

  • Golfschwein

    I agree the 200 series will never become a classic. Too lardy, too fat, too chromey and too ugly to be compared to a Range Rover in the classic stakes.

    It’s highly unlikely that it will ever be exhibited at the Louvre as an example of modern and sculptural art, an honour bestowed upon the Range Rover in 1970. Nothing beats that for kudos.

  • redgum

    my 200seies lc has just clicked over 15000 kms
    it used 1.5 litres of oil in the first 7000 kms and the it used nearly 2 litres inthe last 7000 kms Toyota are looking into it.

    • Keith White

      Hey Redgum

      Did they find out the oil usage problem.

      Thanks

  • Bavarian Missile

    mmmmmm thats the second engine problem with Landcruisers on this site in two days…………

    Yesterday one cracking a head now one using oil.

    Toyota looking into it Redgum,what are they looking into ?

    Tomas said “Wheelnut, do you abuse drugs before you start typing up stuff up?
    A Landcruiser is a World Class Classic!! Monaro is a local bogan legend….Are you even aware how many different clubs there is around Australia, let lone the world, dedicated purely to HJ 40s?? And let me not even get started on the other models…. you call your self a car enthusiast?? More like a gullible GM Holden fan boy….

    Some one pass the mute button for this clown! He speaks out his cracked Prado head!

  • Wheelnut

    Quote [Tomas79]: Wheelnut, do you abuse drugs before you start typing up stuff up?
    A Landcruiser is a World Class Classic!! Monaro is a local bogan legend….

    I think you’d be lucky to find anyone that would pay between $300,000-$1m for a 30 year old Landcruiser that is of course if you can find a 30 year old Landcruiser.

    And yes I realise that GT-HOs and Monaros are Oz only car however the Auctions at which they are sold at are open to intenrational buyers just like Art Auctions etc so its a valid arguement.

  • http://Steeleydan 96/80GXL

    Speaking of dust entry on the Lexus tested by ‘Top Gear”My 80 series lives on dirt roads and other than dust entry through an open window or the fresh air vent when not on recirculate I do not have any door sealing front/rear or tailgate on a vehicle with 300k and 11 years of use, engine still uses no oil to speak of between changes and the auto is functioning well, maybe not the smoothest changing box but reliable. (gas no fuel dilution)
    I agree with Richo, the quality of design and build when the 80 series was released takes some beating, (Turbo diesel bearings aside!)The 200 series is looking and acting like a “soft-roader” more electronics, no fuel range for serious distance. Appearance is akin to a fat overfed, overindulged child with an identity crisis is seriously overpriced. Like the diesel engine though! I’ll be looking at a 70 series in future.

  • aussieaviator

    I just drove a 200 series V8 and I was very dissapointed. Sure it has tons of grunt but the suspension was so soft, obviously designed for the US market. The 6 spped gearbox refused to shift into 6th gear under 106 ks despite the fact that the engine has gobs of torque and would eaisily pull top gear at a lower speed. The owner says that its handling off road leaves a lot to be desired and his wife refuses to drive it off road. For now I will be keeping my beautiful Kakadu TD until Toyota sort out these issues.

  • Brett

    NEW CRUISER IS USING LOTS OF OIL. That’s what i hear from users of the diesel variety. No response known to me from Toyota re. fixing this alleged problem.

    still trying to be convinced Cruiser is still an outstanding off roader deserving of the price with not much more ground clearance over Prado and even new Prado fails in soft sand. only real benefit of cruiser over prado is towing superiority. Hope Patrol comes soon to put some competition and sensibility back into the mix.

  • Nick Wilson

    Dont buy a Landcruiser. The Land ROver discovery is a better car.

  • http://glennfuller2@bigpond.com GLENO

    WELL IVE HAD MY SAHARA twin turbo die for 12 MONTHS NOW AND I,M NOT REALLY THAT HAPPY . $115,000
    I WAS EXPECTING 25 TO 30 MPG .AS I WAS TOLD I SHOULD GET . AS THE ABOVE STATS SAYS AND MENTIONED. WELL THE BEST IVE EVER GOT WAS 14L/100KM. 20MPG. WHICH I WAS GETTING OUT OF MY PETROL 100 SERIES. GOOD FOR TOWING 2.5 TONNE THOUGH. If i had my time again i wouldnt have bought it. i would have kept my old one .

  • Aidan

    My parents got a VX cruiser when they first came out and all we have had is problems with it, these include things like smart keys having to be replaced and the new keys still not working proply, the radio has been replaced and now works alot better with the bluetooth, there is ratels in the roof liner already, the third row seat got big rub marks on them and part of the was replaced but by far the biggest problem has been the big V8 twin turbo diesel motor that was raved about so much at the start but all it has been is problems for example we have had the injectors replace once and they are looking like been replaced again and the econemy is shocking 10.3 ltrs/100kms is bull and i dont no how u got 10 ltrs/100km because that is impossible because the best we have ever got is 12.3 and that was all freeway driving and we also do camping trips and we have a camper trailer and when we we towing that up to coffs harbour we did at best 18 ltrs/100km and we did at one stage 23 ltrs/100km which is worse than the petrol would do im guessing and even our old cruiser did better than that and it 8 yrs old so 10 ltrs/100 was to good to be true

    • Jack

      Wow, Aidan!

      I have very fond memories of my 1986 manual HJ60 series with its anaemic 2H diesel and a 9.5L/100km-10.5L/100km fuel economy unhitched. 13.5L/100km towing a 16 foot caravan. 1900kg weight really helped with that! It was invincible off road and I used it often this way; it didn’t mind a scratch and took me all over our great country reliably, when it was already 18 -20 years of age. 4 flat tyres and a broken solenoid in the starter, in 18 months. Reliable as.

      I also have fond memories of my 1986 FJ73 auto, thirsty on the petrol yes, but incredible on the sand and a lot of fun, in a much smaller package.

      So looking at the new Prados and 200 LandCruisers, there is a lot to live up to – and by the sound of some of the comments, I’d be better off buying another mint FJ73/BJ74, AND an HJ61RG auto for a total of under of $20,000, and keeping the rest of my money! Or a 70 series wagon, but I am not hearing good fuel economy stories from their V8 diesels, either.

  • http://aradvice Garry

    Well I am glad I didn’t trade up my 06 Sahara TD 80k on the clock and runs like a beauty with the electro/ hydraulic suspension system ride height and all the other great features ( many not available in the 200 Sahara ). I though the Sahara 200 series represented poor value for money compared to my 100 series, the fuel consumption issue has been commented on by many I know who own a 200 and they are very dissapointed in this respect.

    Think I will just wait another couple of years and see what happens or seriously look at a BMW X5 TD as an alternative simular money and they run anything from 6-8 Lt per 100kms and go like a cut cat. Service intervals are beyond belief and very resonable cost a real surprise.

    Time will tell if this engine issue is a limited problem or a time bomb, had the same problems with both my 80 series TD cruisers both times. Toyota didn’t really want to know its a pity but an attitude not limited to Toyota as a company.

  • mt

    where do you locate the oilfilter on a series 200 dsl landcruser and is there any special tool to get it out.

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