• Superb 3.2-litre diesel engine, car-like drive with heaps of standard features, good ride and handling on and off road, rear-seat legroom in Dual Cab
  • Polarising front-end styling, no soft-touch dash

OUR RATING
8 / 10



Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review

Mazda BT-50 Dual Cab 4×4: 3.2-litre inline five-cylinder diesel with six-speed automatic transmission, 147kW/470Nm: $50,810 (Manufacturer’s List Price). Minimum and maximum pricing is based on Freestyle and Dual Cab chassis only. Single Cab pricing has not yet been released by Mazda.

You’re right. The front end of the new Mazda BT-50 utility doesn’t look anything like the Ford Ranger. Let’s get that well and truly straight.

The fact is though, that after sitting behind the wheel of the all-new BT-50 for over 250km on the tarmac and off road, Mazda has produced a high quality utility that will deliver more sales for the brand than any previous model.

On sale in Mazda showrooms in November, the BT-50 will be available in no less than nineteen different variants and that’s just with the Dual Cab chassis. Factor in the trim level, chassis and transmission type and there are literally dozens of BT-50 combinations to choose from.

The BT-50 might share the same platform as the Ford Ranger, but that’s where the similarities mostly end.

It’s clear BT-50 program manager Takasuke Kobayashi and his team set out from the very beginning of this project to do something different in the utility space when he said,

“I wanted to move into uncharted territory. I wanted to create a completely different kind of pick-up – one with the personality of a passenger car. So my team developed innovative, dynamic styling and equipment levels that match high-specification CD-segment cars. We re-engineered the technologies in the powertrain, steering system and frame to deliver the Zoom-Zoom driving pleasure that is Mazda’s greatest brand value.”

Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review

Mazda calls the new BT-50 “a genuine active lifestyle vehicle with SUV-like power and handling”.

There is no question that Kobayashi and his design team chose to move away from the blokey styling that most of the Mazda BT-50′s competitors share, and as far as SUV-like power and handling are concerned, you’d have to say Mazda has covered that off too.

Unfortunately we only got to drive the BT-50 with the larger 3.2 litre powertrain at the launch, but can attest its potency and general versatility across a wide range of driving conditions, including some off-road work.

With 147kW at 3000rpm and a stomping 470Nm from a low 1750rpm there was little need to ever change out of third gear when we hit some beautiful undulating landscape out of Canberra. There are huge reserves of pulling power from this inline five-cylinder powerplant and that includes fifth and sixth gear ratios.

There’s little if any turbo lag from this engine and the power is put to the ground via a smooth-shifting six-speed auto transmission, which feels more like what you would expect in a luxury car than a utility of such grand proportions.

Sitting on 90-100km/h in sixth with the auto box and there’s still enough torque to allow the driver to slow down for bends and then accelerate back up to the legal speed limit without having to shift to a lower gear ratio.

In auto guise the Mazda BT-50’s gear ratios are well spaced (if not long) for smooth driving with minimal shifts required up and down the ratio range, even across terrain with varied speed conditions. This kind of gearing also works well in reducing fuel consumption too, but more on that later.

Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review

Equally impressive is what Mazda has been able to achieve in the NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness) department with the BT-50 and this engine in particular. It’s quiet. I mean, it’s SUV-style quiet, even when you’re giving the drive-by-wire throttle a decent old prod.

You won’t pick this engine for a five-cylinder unit. It behaves more like a large six given how rapidly it responds to throttle input and the sheer ‘grunt’ on tap for mid-range acceleration. Overtaking on long straight country roads has never been easier.

While we didn’t focus on the BT-50’s fuel consumption due to there being both an off-road and on-road driving component as well as various driver change stops on the route, Mazda lists the combined consumption for the Dual Cab 4×4 with the 3.2-litre diesel as 9.2L/100km combined with an 80-litre tank.

CarAdvice will run a more detailed review of the BT-50 with real-life fuel consumption testing over an entire week at a later stage, but in the meantime we are comfortable with the published numbers after putting around 300km on the clock and registering a combined figure of 10.6L/100km.

The six-speed manual transmission in the same Dual Cab 4×4 chassis also proved to be a good drive. The shifts are rather spongy, but we do like the stubby little shifter and how it feels in your hand.

First gear is very short, however, and the shift to second requires some man-handling, but the rest of the gear ratios are much easier to engage. So short in fact is first gear that my colleague and I resorted to second gear take offs at the lights in and around the Canberra CBD.

Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review

As much as we enjoyed the manual Mazda BT-50 experience, for an extra $2000 I’d be going with the smooth-shifting six-speed auto, especially for those who will be travelling mostly urban kilometres with plenty of peak hour thrown into the mix.

It’s a fairly advanced gearbox using what Mazda calls Active Adaptive Shift (AAS), which as the name suggests, adapts the shift patterns to driving style. Drivers also have the option of using the Sequential Shift Control (SSC), especially in the kind of hilly terrain that we experienced on the launch route. It’s a relatively quick shifting auto, especially on the downshifts and an excellent marriage with the 3.2-litre diesel.

For a large utility weighing in at just over 2050kg, the Mazda BT-50 has plenty of poise when travelling at speed on bendy roads. The test vehicles were all fitted with the larger 17-inch wheels and the tyres were 265/65 series ‘All Terrain’. Grip levels were excellent and the suspension was relatively pliant on all surfaces, including the off-road sections.

Naturally, there’s a live rear axle with leaf springs at the rear to handle the 3350kg towing capacity, while the front end gets independent double wishbone with coil over dampers and anti-roll bar. The combination produces a reasonably pliant ride, even over the rough stuff. It’s not quite car-like but overall it’s a more comfortable ride than many will expect from such a robust utility.

Mazda has got the steering just right in the BT-50 too and that’s a direct result of moving from a ‘ball-and-nut’ set-up to a rack and pinion system (some would say about time) as well as a quicker steering-gear ratio that in the case of the BT-50 offers quick response and plenty of weight in the steering for more feel through the wheel.

Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review


Despite the extra length of the new Mazda BT-50 (that’s 220mm for the 4WD variants and 235mm for the 2WD variants) our Dual Cab 4×4 was decidedly agile through what was a rather tight off-road course.

Brake disc size has also increased from 14 to 16 inches, although the industry still makes do with drums on the rear. That said, brake pedal response on the BT-50 is responsive and linear.

Off road, the BT-50 4×4 is an adept performer. With so much low-down torque, the steep and slippery hill climbs were all too easy. So too is switching from 2H to 4H. You can do that on the fly by simply twisting a dial to the right of the shifter, which is what we did when we went from tarmac to dusty dirt road.

To engage 4L the driver simply needs to stop and engage neutral, then turn the dial, it’s that simple. If you need the BT-50 to climb to rock steps or another steep bank, you can also lock up the rear diff electronically, and that works a treat. Not once did the vehicle stumble through what might have been a challenging course for other vehicles in this segment. It was all too easy in the Mazda.

Mazda’s Kobayashi was going for a car-like experience with the BT-50, and together with the cabin’s exceptional NVH is a stylish and well laid out centre stack and console. You certainly don’t feel like you’re in a tradesman’s work vehicle, and that’s exactly what Mazda was aiming for.

The driver’s instrument panel is more like what you would expect in an SUV than a utility, and the sports steering wheel carries remote switches for Bluetooth phone, audio and cruise control – standard features across the BT-50 range, along with an exhaustive list of creature comforts. The fabric seats are easy on the back and exceptionally comfortable, and there’s a tonne of storage spaces throughout the cockpit.

Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review

As ‘car-like’ as the interior is, Mazda has chosen not to go with a soft-touch dash. In fact, I’m yet to drive a Mazda that has such. It’s high time that a manufacturer of such quality vehicles started to focus some attention on the touch and feel of plastics and materials used inside the cabin of its cars. Styling aside, it’s one of the few criticisms that can be levelled at Mazda’s BT-50.

Given that Mazda is aiming the new BT-50 at a wider buying group including those with outdoor lifestyle activities and some of those folks with families in tow, standard fitment across all three trim grades is a full suite of active and passive safety kit including Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) with ABS, EBD and traction control. Add to that features such as Brake Override System (BOS), Load Adaptive Control (LAC), Trailer Sway Control, Roll Stability Control, Hill Launch Assist and Hill Decent Control and it’s pretty much all accounted for.

Mazda has also strengthened the body shell of the latest BT-50. Ultra-high-tensile steel has been used for the rocker panels. In addition, the body shell of the new model Mazda BT-50 has around 20 per cent more torsional rigidity than the current model.

Several of the launch vehicles were fitted with one of two new accessory kits; called the Boss Sports kit (a unique airbag-compatible alloy bull bar, Lightforce Genesis Driving Lights, 17-inch alloys and stainless side steps and a lockable hard tonneau cover).

The other kit is called Boss Adventure and the only real difference between the two is a steel bull bar and a soft tonneau cover. Prices for these two kits have not yet been signed off by Mazda Australia.

Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review

It’s not perfect, there’s that styling issue that will be a problem for some, but in the BT-50, Mazda has produced what should be a ‘tough as nails’ utility that is more car-like than most of its competitors in both driveability and comfort.

Mazda BT-50 Features

XT 2.2L4x2 Single Cab Chassis

  • 2.2 litre in-line 4 cylinder 16 valve DOHC intercooled turbo diesel
  • Max. power: 110 kW @ 3,700 rpm
  • Max. torque: 375 Nm @ 1,500 – 2,500 rpm
  • 80 litre fuel tank capacity
  • 6-speed manual
  • Fuel consumption (combined): 7.6 litres per 100km
  • 16 inch steel wheels with 215/70 tyres
  • Door handles (black)
  • Front bumper (body coloured)
  • Headlamps (halogen)
  • Power windows and mirrors (black)
  • Air-conditioning
  • Bluetooth® (hands-free compatible)
  • Cruise control
  • Floor covering: vinyl
  • Seat trim: cloth
  • Seat (driver’s front bucket) with: adjustable head restraint and rake and slide adjustment
  • Seat (passenger’s front bench) with: adjustable head restraint
  • Tilt-adjustable steering wheel
  • Trip computer
  • Wipers (front) 2-speed with variable intermittent function
  • Audio system with: AM/FM tuner. single-disc CD player and 4 speakers
  • Bluetooth® audio (MP3 player compatible)
  • Steering-wheel-mounted audio controls
  • USB input (iPod® compatible)
  • Airbags SRS: front (driver and passenger) and curtain (driver and passenger)
  • Anti-lock Braking System (ABS)
  • Dynamic Stability Control (DSC)
  • Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD)
  • Emergency Brake Assist (EBA)
  • Engine immobiliser
  • Hill Launch Assist (HLA)
  • Load Adaptive Control (LAC)
  • Remote central locking (2 transmitters with retractable key)
  • Roll Stability Control (RSC)
  • Side impact door beams
  • Traction Control System (TCS)
  • Trailer Sway Control (TSC)
  • Ground clearance (laden): 135 mm
  • Overall length: 5,124 mm
  • Overall width: 1,850 mm
  • Overall height: 1,703 mm
  • Wading depth: 600 mm
  • Payload: 1,306 kg
  • Towing capacity(braked): 2,500 kg

 

XT 3.2L4x2 Single Cab Chassis4x4 Single Cab Chassis 

Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review

XT features additional to the XT include:

  • 3.2 litre in-line 4 cylinder 17 valve DOHC intercooled turbo diesel
  • Max. power: 147 kW @ 3,000 rpm
  • Max. torque: 470 Nm @ 1,750 – 2,500 rpm
  • Fuel consumption (combined): 8.4 (4×2) 8.9 (4×4) litres per 100km
  • 16 inch steel wheels with 255/70 tyres
  • Hill Descent Control (HDC) – 4×4 only
  • Locking Rear Differential (LRD) – 4×4 only
  • Ground clearance (laden): 200 mm
  • Overall height: 1,800 mm
  • Payload: 1,508 kg (4×2) 1,343 kg (4×4)
  • Towing capacity(braked): 3,350 kg

 

XT4x2 Freestyle Cab Chassis4x4 Freestyle Cab Chassis 

  • 3.2 litre in-line 5 cylinder 20 valve DOHC intercooled turbo diesel
  • Max. power: 147 kW @ 3,000 rpm
  • Max. torque: 470 Nm @ 1,750 – 2,500 rpm
  • 80 litre fuel tank capacity
  • 6-speed manual
  • Fuel consumption (combined): 8.4 (4×2) 8.9 (4×4) litres per 100km
  • 16 inch steel wheels with 255/70 tyres
  • Door handles (black)
  • Front bumper (body coloured)
  • Headlamps (halogen)
  • Power windows and mirrors (black)
  • Air-conditioning
  • Bluetooth® (hands-free compatible)
  • Cruise control
  • Floor covering: vinyl
  • Seat trim: cloth
  • Seats (passenger’s rear bench) with: foldable seat base and under-seat storage
  • Tilt-adjustable steering wheel
  • Trip computer
  • Wipers (front) 2-speed with variable intermittent function
  • Audio system with: AM/FM tuner. single-disc CD player and 6 speakers
  • Bluetooth® audio (MP3 player compatible)
  • Steering-wheel-mounted audio controls
  • USB input (iPod® compatible)
  • Airbags SRS: front (driver and passenger), side (front) and curtain (front and rear)
  • Anti-lock Braking System (ABS)
  • Child restraint anchor points (2)
  • Dynamic Stability Control (DSC)
  • Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD)
  • Emergency Brake Assist (EBA)
  • Engine immobiliser
  • Hill Descent Control (HDC) – 4×4 only
  • Hill Launch Assist (HLA)
  • Load Adaptive Control (LAC)
  • Locking Rear Differential (LRD) – 4×4 only
  • Remote central locking (2 transmitters with retractable key)
  • Roll Stability Control (RSC)
  • Side impact door beams
  • Traction Control System (TCS)
  • Trailer Sway Control (TSC)
  • Overall length: 5,124 mm
  • Overall width: 1,850 mm
  • Overall height: 1,804 mm
  • Wading depth: 800 mm
  • Payload: 1,430 kg (4×2) 1,343 kg (4×4)
  • Towing capacity(braked): 3,350 kg

 

XTR4x4 Freestyle Cab UtilityXTR features additional to the XT include:

Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
  • 17 inch alloy wheels with 265/65 tyres
  • Door handles (chrome)
  • Fog-lamps (front)
  • Power mirrors (chrome)
  • Rear step bumper (chrome)
  • Side steps (aluminium finish)
  • Air-conditioning (dual-zone climate control)
  • Ambient temperature gauge
  • Floor covering: carpet
  • Leather wrapped: gear shift knob and steering wheel
  • Satellite navigation
  • Seats (driver’s front bucket) with: height and lumbar adjustment (driver)
  • High mount stop lamp
  • Overall length: 5,365 mm
  • Overall height: 1,810 mm
  • Payload: 1,163 kg

 

XT4x2 Dual Cab Utility4x4 Dual Cab Chassis4x4 Dual Cab Utility

  • 3.2 litre in-line 5 cylinder 20 valve DOHC intercooled turbo diesel
  • Max. power: 147 kW @ 3,000 rpm
  • Max. torque: 470 Nm @ 1,750 – 2,500 rpm
  • 80 litre fuel tank capacity
  • 6-speed manual or 6-speed automatic – utilities only
  • Fuel consumption (combined): 8.4 (4×2 manual) 8.9 (4×2 auto) 8.9 (4×4 manual) 9.2 (4×4 auto) litres per 100km
  • 16 inch steel wheels with 255/70 tyres
  • Door handles (black)
  • Front bumper (body coloured)
  • Headlamps (halogen)
  • Power windows and mirrors (black)
  • Rear step bumper (black) – utilities only
  • Air-conditioning
  • Bluetooth® (hands-free compatible)
  • Cruise control
  • Floor covering: vinyl
  • Seat trim: cloth
  • Seats (passenger’s rear bench) with: foldable seat base and under-seat storage
  • Tilt-adjustable steering wheel
  • Trip computer
  • Wipers (front) 2-speed with variable intermittent function
  • Audio system with: AM/FM tuner. single-disc CD player and 6 speakers
  • Bluetooth® audio (MP3 player compatible)
  • Steering-wheel-mounted audio controls
  • USB input (iPod® compatible)
  • Airbags SRS: front (driver and passenger), side (front) and curtain (front and rear)
  • Anti-lock Braking System (ABS)
  • Child restraint anchor points (2)
  • Dynamic Stability Control (DSC)
  • Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD)
  • Emergency Brake Assist (EBA)
  • Engine immobiliser
  • High mount stop lamp – utilities only
  • Hill Descent Control (HDC) – 4×4 only
  • Hill Launch Assist (HLA)
  • Load Adaptive Control (LAC)
  • Locking Rear Differential (LRD) – 4×4 only
  • Remote central locking (2 transmitters with retractable key)
  • Roll Stability Control (RSC)
  • Side impact door beams
  • Traction Control System (TCS)
  • Trailer Sway Control (TSC)
  • Overall length: 5,124 mm (cab chassis) 5,373 mm (utilities)
  • Overall width: 1,850 mm
  • Overall height: 1,815 mm
  • Wading depth: 800 mm
  • Payload from 1,139 kg – 4×4 auto
  • Towing capacity(braked): 3,350 kg

 

XTR4x2 Dual Cab Utility4x4 Dual Cab Utility 

Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review
Mazda BT-50 Review

XTR features additional to the XT include:

  • 17 inch alloy wheels with 265/65 tyres
  • Door handles (chrome)
  • Fog-lamps (front)
  • Power mirrors (chrome)
  • Rear step bumper (chrome)
  • Side steps (aluminium finish)
  • Air-conditioning (dual-zone climate control)
  • Ambient temperature gauge
  • Floor covering: carpet
  • Leather wrapped: gear shift knob and steering wheel
  • Satellite navigation
  • Seats (driver’s front bucket) with: height and lumbar adjustment (driver)
  • Overall length: 5,365 mm
  • Overall height: 1,821 mm
  • Payload: from 1,097 kg – 4×4 auto
GT4x4 Dual Cab UtilityGT features additional to the XTR include:

  • Headlamps auto on/off function
  • Rear-view mirror with auto dimming function
  • Seat trim: leather
  • Wipers (front) 2-speed with rain-sensing function
  • Payload: from 1,088 kg – 4×4 automatic


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MAZDA BT-50 BREAKDOWN

Mazda BT-50 Review
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  • AB

    Problem is, as a private buyer I have to purchase my own vehicles and styling is a major factor, regardless how good the car is.
    If I am going to put down $50K on a car, I have to like/be satisfied with its looks… and this just doesnt work for me…

    Therefore Ranger is hands down winner for my money

    • http://www.caradvice.com.au Anthony Crawford

      Perhaps you should drive both before a final decision. That said the BT-50 and Ford Ranger seem to be the pick of the bunch in this segment.

      • scottjames_12

        So, Anthony, which would you choose? Ranger or BT-50?

        • http://www.caradvice.com.au Anthony Crawford

          I’d need to drive them both back-to-back and way up things like resale and reliability. That said it would be a tough choice if that was my work vehicle.

          • Alex

            How can they differ when they are the same truck?

          • Caroline

            They are not the same truck at all. The have the same engine and the same transmission and front window screen, but everything else is different from suspension, to bolts to parts. No longer can a Ford owner walk into a Mazda dealership and buy parts like you could with the BT50 3.0L. With the new models you  have to source genuine parts as they wont fit on the same car and visa versa. Ford also are a lot more expensive for a car that handles not as well off unsealed roads.

    • Sumpguard

      I agree with AB. Most people would take appearance above a couple of extra features or a slightly better ride.

      The mazda’s looks would be very hard for me to live with day in day out and the simple fix would be to redesign those massive indicators in the headlights.

      It’s a shame they couldn’t match the quality of the exterior with the interior because inside it looks very well done.

      As an ex-tradie I can tell you they pretty much all want a rugged look in their utes and this will affect the mazda’s sales imo. I really can’t see this ute doing that well here in Australia despite their forcasts.

      • scottjames_12

        Yep I’m inclined to agree. They say first impressions last and I think a lot of potential customers will not even give the BT-50 a go once they see it. Especially as it does not have any must have extras compared to the Ranger.

        • Dan

          Problem with the Ranger will be resale due to the Ford badge. Mazda will hold its value a lot better.

          • scottjames_12

            Really? Did a bit of a look on Redbook and it looks like the BT-50 and Ranger are about the same, resale wise?

        • http://www.caradvice.com.au Anthony Crawford

          Are you kidding about the extras? Did you even see the list of features at the bottom of the review? The BT-50 as another reader has said has a class leading interior – that includes the extensive level of standard kit. Your statement is just plain incorrect and ill-informed.

          • scottjames_12

            Ok, Anthony, if I’m so incorrect and ill-informed, please enlighten me as to what the BT-50 has that the Ranger doesn’t?

            Seems to me the only thing you can get on the BT-50 that you can’t get on the Ranger is leather trim. The BT-50 on the other hand makes no mention of power seats, let alone 8-way power heated seats available in the Ranger Wildtrak. Or rear parking sensors. Or a reversing camera.

            I’m not saying it’s a bad interior, I actually quite like it. But I like the Ranger’s even more. And there isn’t anything in the BT-50 that would make me choose it over the Ranger.

          • Jay

            scott, firstly they are still a ute and having power seats is just silly. Trades will get dust etc in the door and screw the switch/electrics to it. Did you say sensors or camera… (on a ute?) You don’t need that unless your a s#%t driver. You might as well go and buy a falcon/taxi and put fairy lights on it!!
            I would buy the BT-50 over the Ranger due to the quality and reliability which comes from the Mazda Brand, Ford has no quality when it comes to mind for me.
            Resales – it might say in redbook (mind you redbook doesn’t buy cars) that they are the same in value after 3 odd years but the market dictates what they are worth and the Ranger is known as the Cheaper quality of the 2.
            I personally think the new BT-50 is different but everyone is going to follow suit and radically change there SUV’s and UTES.

      • Caroline

        I totally have to disagree. Its human nature that you initally do not like the look of the BT50. No one liked the Commodore VE when it came out, but over time everyone opinion was changed. What I love about the BT50 now is it LOOKS like a Mazda. If you see it on the road you will know by its distinct shape and headlights that it is a Mazda. And thats what Mazda was going for. This car has been selling out under our feet faster than what we can keep up with. (Yes I work for Mazda). And the rear diff lock and the Hill Decent Control are two incredible features. Trust me, take this baby out to a quarry and you’ll be more impressed with its performance than what you think.

        • Simone Robinson

          I am currently looking for a towing vehicle for my horse float. Originally i started out looking at a nissan navara and came across a BT50. Its” looks” is what got my attention!!! From front on i found it reminded me of a dodge ram! (which i cant afford). The price of a BT50 is in my market. Does anyone have any comments about the BT50″s towing capabilites. I know it has 470 nm and 147kw, and its turbo diesel. I currently drive a Nissan Navara 266nm, 125kw, petrol and tows ok on the flat, but really struggles on a hill. Thanks for any advice!! :)))

          • Tradie that prefers Quality

            I have a Nissan Navara ST-x and have replaced 5 sets of front brakes, rear axles, and snapped a timing chain which put a $11k dint in the wallet, nice drive but sh!t car for 4×4 (soft)and Nissan are not getting me back, I’m now looking at the bt-50 and Ranger.

          • Gawilliams66

            Hi Simone,

            I have the dbl cab 4×2 (company car) and I have towed a dbl axle horse float, all up weight with 2 horses was around 2400kg, with still 935kg left over!!! It drives very well does not throw the vehicle around and there is plenty of power, I live in Auckland and can comfortabley cruise up the Bombay hills at 90kmh towing the float…….. Just wish I had the 4×4…..

          • Sambo

            This post is a little late, but in case you still haven’t made a choice, I bought the BT50 dual cab with the very same aim in mind; towing horses. The car does it easily. I have the manual gear box and can not recommend the car highly enough. There is a huge “but” however.  I have just costed getting the rear suspension upgraded, as the leaf springs are flattening out at 30k. I love the car-like interior and the gadgets, but just keep the suspension upgrade in mind.

          • davies

            I bought 1 for towing 2000k later it just stops dead any where any time….they dont no what the problem is even the computer dosent pick it up but there is a big killer fault ….MAZDA expect me to TOW my horses with it NEVER would I I dont trust them …..wish i had kept my 4.2 nissan never had a problem

        • Ronald

          im trying to make up my mind between a BT 50 and an Amarok.  Sure the BT 50 has a better list of goodies,but Amarok is a much wider truck.  Looks are not everything.  But the manual gearbox feels like there’s a pile of gravel and dirt in there already, before its even been to a quarry.  Why not a nice slick and smooth gearbox like I had my my MX5?

      • Notsogreynomad

        Dear Sumpguard, After reading all reviews on these utes, it is plainly clear that men and women differ completely when it comes to looks of vehicles.  Being an ex tradie I can see why the Ranger would impress you over the Mazda as MOST men would go for the rugged and BORING look of the Ranger or Navara etc.  Personally, myself being a woman would definitely pick the BT50 for its smooth lines and geat shape over the others which are all very box shaped. I think MOST women would agree on this. They’re not all built just for you blokes, you know!  But I am enjoying reading the reviews just the same.  C’mon girls, we want to hear your Reviews too !

  • master

    It does have some styling issues, but the more I see it the more I get over it. The XTR and GT have some extras that the Ranger doesn’t (e.g. Satnav and Leather) + chuck in the Boss Pack and you have a well appointed, capable and decent looking 4WD ute. At a lower price too! I will definetly give it a drive and look over.

    • Modern Man

      Yes i understand the bt-50 looks good value with the satnav and leather pack, the wildtrak gets that and more admitedtly at a much higher price as there are heaps of other extras on this vehicle.

      The Ranger comes standard with 3350kg towpack, bedliner and sportsbar on xlt and wildtrak.

      Spec adjusted prices would be the same between the two but ford throws more as standard.

      I work in a large multi franchise dealer and unfortunatly unlike their passenger range, the BT-50 does not resale better than a Ranger due to its softer styling and slight lack of standard kit.

      Real world specs much larger than redbook wich is notoriously wrong to the whole motor trade. it is to be used as a guide only as their own website states.

      • Igomi Watabi

        I just couldn’t be seen in anything called “Wildtrak”!

  • John

    It honestly looks like they converted a Mazda 3 into a ute, and it hasn’t worked.

    • Daniel

      IMO it looks better than the updated hilux. But the Ranger looks better. The interior of the Mazda is spot on for me. But it is only my opinion. I reckon the styling will be a winner in Thailand…

      • MRL

        Mazda have already stated that they believe Australia to be the BT-50′s biggest market. Seeing as Thai’s buy almost 50,000 diesel pickups/month, that pretty much tells me they already know they’ve got no hope in the TH market.

  • BP

    The tailights remind me that the car wants to fly off into the air.

  • JEKYL & HYDE

    i’m sorry but,…

    one (well fed) skippy the kangeroo vrs both those bullbars is going to result in a panelbeaters win.

    might look good,sure hides the ugly front well,but not very functional for the rural area’s…

    • http://www.caradvice.com.au Anthony Crawford

      The Alloy bull bar has been tested on fake Roo with a 100km/h impact with no damage to the bar or vehicle. Mazda showed us the video.

      • Rohandummett

         check the video again, as the bullbar looks broken to me..

    • Salt and Vinegar Chips

      You know nothing!

  • Wal

    The real question is, how is this compared to the industry standard- hilux?

    • Jay

      Wal the Hilux sells on the name but is slowly dying as Toyota have no idea on what people want. If they listened to the people they would have the Hilux towing 3,000 kg. there are caravans etc now which are over 2.5T unloaded and the “industry STANDARD’ Hilux can’t do the job”
      Hilux was yesterday’s news no today’s or the future. SORRY

  • AOK

    A Mazda Ute with “Style”…inside and out…FULL MARKS MAZDA…Again!…
    BTW: Made in the same Thailand plant.

  • alan

    Whoever designed those new style headlights, many car manufacturers are using lately, SHOULD BE SENT TO SIBERIA TO STRAIGHTEN UP!!! How ugly they are. Like the eyes of an alien, or a giant insect in a horror movie! They must be about half a metre long!!! How expensive is one of them to replace? 400 Dollars, or what?! Thanks god, at least a few companies like Audi or Volkswagen don’t follow this STUPID, UGLY fashion.

    • http://www.uhvourbvruo.com geezer

      Yikes…….. its the “Predator” ute.

    • Mix75

      So go buy a Audi or Volkswagon. That’s the beauty of such a diverse market. Enjoy whatever you buy Alan ;)

  • Wal

    I’m confused, what segment is this for? And isn’t the hilux the one to compare to?

    • Billy N

      Reputation alone means Hilux will never be challenged. Cant see BHP / Rio Tinto switching over to Mazda BT-50′s regardless of how good they might be.

      • Billy T

        Rio tinto use whatever is at the right price and meets their criteria. I think I may be driving a BT50 at work in the near future

      • Mix75

        I beg to differ Billy N, I’m seeing a lot of corporate shift allready.. watch that space…

      • Colin Mackey

        Rio Tinto are switching over to the NEW Ford Ranger due to the Hilux not having a 5 star rating.

    • Mix75

      Not anymore Wal, We have two seperate family friends that have a new model Hilux’. One regullarly tows horse floats and has burnt through 4 clutches, the other friends have burnt through one clutch… no towing… what’s up with that? A lot of people we are talking to on the tracks are saying Hilux needs a real lift with the new competition.

      • Colin Mackey

        I agree

  • Guy Rigoni

    Tradies will far outweigh private buyers in this segment, so looks will count for little. Mazda should be on a winner here. I expect them to sell more than the Ranger as that vehicle is a Ford, for which is a turn off for a lot of buyers (think Courier….ugh)

  • Bazza

    Looks a lot worse in the pics, saw one at a Mazda dealer this morning and they’re quite similar to a Hilux. Interior is best in class my a counrty mile.

  • http://caradvice maersk

    Just saw one today driving near townsville,way better looking in the flesh than any photos suggest,i admit i was a big hater of the styling until 2day….cheers all…

    • MRL

      Yep, you have to see the BT-50 in the metal.

      It’s still ugly, but not bite-your-arm-off and vomit all over her face fugly, as it appears in the pics.

      • Deane

        Note to self: Don’t “visit” with MRL.

  • Ford Man

    What is this fascination with ‘soft touch plastics’. Who the f$&@ touches a dash to see how it feels.

    • Modern Man

      I agree.

      The only thing i want soft in my dash is an airbag. durability and easy of cleaning, no reflection in windscreen is what i want.

    • o

      Agree, as long as it looks good who cares, I’m sick of this being an issue.

  • Shak

    I probably have to see one in the flesh before i make final judgement…but honestly how much better could it look. i dont think many Tradies or the types of people who buy these cars will take very well to a car that looks like……..that.

    • Tradie that prefers Quality

      the Triton was an eyesore but it only took a year and every one got over it
      IMO the same will happen here….and bang on a bullbar with spotties and a couple of big ass ariels and you won’t even remember what the front looked liked..

  • hermz

    Great review Anthony. Personally the style has never seemed polarising to me just different to the usual American pickup truck, I like the fact i can go in to my dealer and buy accessories like bull bars and canopy’s with a Mazda factory warranty. Ford told me there would be a range of aftermarket canopy’s and bull bars in the near future. I hope to see a white one with the black boss pack to help make my decision easier :)

  • iNoob

    What I dislike most about that dash cluster is how difficult it is to clean it up >< .. even in the 3, the 6 – need to get some extra long brushes or compressed air in those (very) fiddly spaces around the cluster …

  • Snoop

    I can’t get passed the MASSIVE wheel arches at the front that lead to nothing at the back.
    IMO the styling for utes like these should not share similar styling to the cars.
    I think Mazda are doing some great things but, this needs a quick revision.

  • http://Caradvice HumpDiggy

    I was sold on the Ranger, but is still slightly out of my price range. I think the BT 50 is slightly more reasonably priced. The Mazda will look a lot better in real life than the pictures I believe.

    • David

      I agree whole-heartedly!! As for the looks, I was standing next to one in the showroom today and it was not the looks that I noticed, it’s the size.. This thing is HUGE, and am glad to see that it is, as it will easily fit the lads in on a weekend away.

  • http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/blink_me192/KODOBT50.jpg Baji

    ^^

    Kodo-fied BT50

  • Grumpy01

    Can’t believe I’m saying this but each time I look at it it gets better looking.

  • http://caradvice tradie

    i drove the new bt50 today and wow it looks better than the pics and to drive wow i have a nissan stx and the bt50 sh#ts on it

  • http://www.ozmazda.com/ ozmazda

    Well done Mazda for another bold and fresh look within your range. It takes balls to step outside the circle and you did that with the 3 and many in the media doubted that the front end would sell…..well you showed them. It’s great to see a new look in the ute range as the typical ute is bland and boring and the Ranger looks like a regurgitated american lunch…..
    Here in Orange my local Mazda dealer has heaps of orders and some are coming from the mines so for those that say blokes wont buy it because of the looks……you maybe wrong. I will say it wont sell like the Ranger as Mazda doesnt sell itself short on govo or fleet sales so Ford will try and flood the market but Mazda will reap in the more profit…
    I’ll look at a leased one next year in GT form instead of a CX5…

  • http://justcommodores.com.au Gravity

    Looks seriously ugly to me. Ford Ranger looks good.

    • utegirl

      sorry the ranger has good specs but boring as batsh*t to look at & way too pricey – mazda def the go

  • col

    This looks really nice in the metal.

  • John

    The question remains – how reliable will it be ? It has a dual mass clutch apparently & this type of clutch is notoriously fragile. [Google clutch problems for some of its competitors & see what i mean!]Also this is a new engine in a configuration that is unusual & now discarded by VW in their Transporters. Why? First model runs often have problems so time will tell!

  • Derek Holden

    I run a transport business and a SDX auto Dual Cab has been my drive vehicle for the past three years. It is reliable, comfortable,has heaps of power and is great value. Offroad, it goes whereever I want it to without modifications apart from a snorkel and I have owned Turbo landcruisers and Pajeros.

    My only criticisms were there was no cruise control or bluetooth and rear legroom was minimal as was access for an adult(kids o.k.)but Mazda has addressed this in the new model.

    I just saw the new model in the flesh and yes it does look like a ’3′ or even a futuristic Mitsubishi Triton but I have found that the ’3′ styling grows on you.

    Who cares about Ford vs Mazda. The reality is if your a Ford buff you’ll buy a Ranger, if you like Mazda what choice is there but what it will do is turn heads and bring in new buyers & at 50k it’ll will make Toyota buyers think twice.

    Finally though, no matter what tweaks Ford make to differentiate the Ranger; it’s still Mazda technology that they chose. So, I guess I’ll go and arrange a test drive…. of a Mazda. After all, I own one now and love it.

  • Denis Dwyer

    I have been following this vehicle in the press for a while and am starting to notice that it is growing on me already.

    I’m keen to see just how good this motor and gearbox combo will be and then want to see how well the tail gate seals… or does it adapt to have a rubber seal fitted for those dust roads we have.

    When will the manufactures start to design the rear door so that an after market seal can be fitted to the tail gate. Fit a good canopy and I hope it will not be like a vacuum cleaner dust trap out there!!

  • http://www.caradvice.com.au/142496/mazda-bt-50-review/ matt

    i just bought a bt50 and i have to say i think that the ford ranger looks better but the bt50 is the best ute ive driven and i also drove the ranger. Hilux never even came close. If anybody remembers when the triton was released in its new shape people were disgusted, but it grew and now its one of Australias most popular utes. The mazda is hands down the best to drive with alot of extras included. Dont be too hasty to judge a book by its cover.

  • h

    Does it come in mens?

    • friend of h

      Yes “h” it comes in black. But not for you. Sorry, you’ll have to settle for fleet white. Enjoy your Bt-50.

  • Roh

    Sure buy one. Just dont go too far, too often when it gets a bit of wear on it. Check the pricing of a basket of parts like CV’s, wheel bearings, etc. Mazada parts are BS pricing(not the general servicing),then decide. Thats why you see *ahem* other brands constantly in the country. Yeah they aren’t perfect either but a large and accessible range of HD aftermarket choices for parts helps.

    These Mazada/Amarok/Ranger etc thingies are for “tooling” (or being tooled?) round the ‘burbs with the odd foray into real 4wd territories. Not often do they survive there for any length of time.

    But as the(bank?)advert used to say “its your money, Ralph” and also I give a nod to Billy N’s comment above…

  • Ed

    My wife & I are in the market for a new 4×4 dual cab, we’d like to know whats the turning circle like for doing 3 point turns, u turns, reverse parking etc & would you buy the manual or auto if you were going to tow a caravan ? I’ve heard you can burn the clutch out by doing to much reversing into spots with the caravan. So maybe the 6 speed auto is the go, don’t mind the looks of the new BT50

  • Gino

    Test drove both and would have to say the ranger looks better but the Mazda wins hands down with it’s reliability factor/badge and price. But they both take the 4×4 sector to a new level, simply pure grunt, power and classy. Farmers will love it, especially the auto. The price variance with the same accessories is about $5000.00! Also I might add that having a Mazda sp25 also made my mind up. I once had an issue with the 3 that Mazda Australia promptly fixed, and installed upgrades which they didn’t have to. I’ve had issues with the clutch in both a Nissan SDX and Pathfinder that Nissan needs to address, so I can see the Maxda/Ranger will take sales off mainly Nissan. I have a Hilux SR5, done 200,000 k’s and never been touched. Will never go to Toyota simply because of the dealership here in Bundaberg.(the same applies to Ford).

  • BP

    I think even Mazda Australia is embarrassed by the front end of this Ute. This is shown through the recent ad where ther moving ute shown throughout the ad has a added bullbar on the front to cover up the polarising look.

    Even at the end of the ad, 2 of three utes are shown with bullbars & the one ute without it is half cut off by the camera & is situated at the back of the screen so you have to squint to see it.

  • Billy T

    Disappointed freestyle cab chassis doesn’t have auto option.I drive a Navara D22 and are about to upgrade. So far have tested ntssan D33 Hilux and Triton. Hilux was over priced and disappointing Navara was okay Triton seemed the pick of the pack. Will test a BT50 this week and going by the brouchers and pricing is looking like a winner. Zoom Zoom

    • Billy T

      sorry about typo should be nissan D40 not D33

  • Boycie

    I have always liked the Ranger look, but the BT-50 is growing on me. After a few weeks comparing the two, the Ranger is starting to look a bit like just a sort of nice facelift model. Sort of same old same old. The BT-50 instead appears new, and has grown on me. After I got over the first impression – I now think it looks wicked and wow! So the BT-50 is ordered!

  • Muzza

    I have been test driving for a new ute, SR5, amarok, and BT50, is it me, or is there excessive noise coming from clutch/transmisssion ? on gear changes. I have asked the dealer what the noise is, he has replied saying its how the cylinders line up diffferently (being the 5 cylinder) within the rev ranges – can anyone else provide me with info, or whether these noises subside with some k’s on it. Like the BT.

  • mark morrison

    This BT will grow on you the more you look the more you drive, i love it

  • pedro

    Red book has no idea on resale value . Its just there opinion nothing more and there opinion is usually wrong

  • Boycie

    Just had the first 1,000kms in my new BT50 auto 4WD.  They all said it was good – said it 50 different ways they did.  They lied.  It’s better than that.  We have just had record rain here (750mm in 48 hours); and had to get out across a swamped paddock.  I should have been stuck (like the neigbours Hilux) – but the ute hardly even left a tyre mark.  The old farmer sitting in the back was speechless.  And it handles and passes on the road with attitude.  It actually drives like a good car should.  The neighbours teenage sons thought it looked sort of wicked and devious – haha

  • Mattc

    i just had my 10000 service on the bt50 and i can honestly say that no other utes compare. As a plumber i haul some heavy loads and it doesnt have any issues. Ive got my fuel consumption down as low as 8.5L/100 which is fantastic for such a big vehicle and it drives perfect. I towed 3 tonne last week and i had no problems at all. I originally had ordered and left a deposit on a hilux but after driving this baby, the hilux is only a name, dont get me wrong hilux is a great vehicle but i think that other brands have caught them  and the ranger and bt50 have passed them.Toyota have become complacent in their  features, and i dont understand if they can now add a sat nav in their vehicle and lower the price by $3000, doesnt that mean that they have ripped us off for all these years selling Hilux for high 50′s? Hilux was the best for many years but now they have been dethroned by a bigger stronger vehicle with more features and better safety, Anyone who bought a hilux over a ranger or bt50 is either nuts or a toyota fan.

    • bert

      Hi I am looking at buying a BT 50, have driven the hilux navara and new colarado,Did you drive the Ranger, on paper it has a bigger turning circle than the BT 

  • Nathen77

    hi every one
    let me start that i currantly own a xr6 turbo .i have a wife and 2 kids.
    these cars are no longer looked at as tradie utes!!!
    im in the market for a new car and i was looking at the new ss commodore.
    me and the wife decided to look at the duel cabs due to there versatility.
    no longer need a box trailer,can tow the boat,cheaper on fuel,sit higher,better resale.
    i have looked at all the pick ups in this segment .
    and i always loved the navara.i had my heart set on 1.
    i will list the things that put me off and what we liked about each car.
    i am not being biased or 1 eyed.
    and all cars were driven in manual .all turbo diesel ,1 twin turbo amarok
    amarok
    height and size was great .interior room great.moter did not feel very torque down low gear box a bit notchy not sure if this would go away after a few more kms on the clock.bit pricey for the level of equipment you get.

    triton.
    did not mind the tritan.great price .10 years warranty on vehicle road side assist.
    reasonable resale .big let down was rear seat and leg room.the leg room is what turned me off this car.as well as sounding a tad more noisey than the others..

    hilux
    very out dated.gear box out dated ,stereo etc out dated.high price for what i thought was the worst of the lot!!!!
    in my eyes toyota are just living on there name plate!!!and price does not reflect the car.

    navara.
    my favourite.
    great price dealer could offer me a brand new d40 for 38 0000
    what put me off.interior out dated compared to the bt50/amarok/ranger.
    and the clutch!!!after so many reports and the sales man telling me nissan will not cover cost of clutch put me right off.
    what was once a tuff looking truck looks now a bit smaller compared to the amarok/ranger /bt50

    ranger.
    looks tuff and more like its american brothers.a big thumbs up from me
    feel of the car was not as smooth as the mazda.
    i hated the dash!!!!looked like a magna!!!
    was more expensive than the mazda

    mazda bt50
    i love the looks .a lot smoother  more torque .
    compared to the amarok feels like it has more torque and turbos cut in at the right time.felt more like a car.my pick of the lot .and the wife likes it as well.
    down side price!!!

    • notsogreynomad

      Thanks Nathen.  All the hard work has been done.  A lot of these reviewers had not tested all of the utes, but you did.  Good on ya champ!

  • Druid 66

    Agreed all of the above girlie utes are very pretty and quite nice if you`re a Townie boy or a Lady Hairdresser.

    In the meantime Real Men Drive Land Rovers.

    • Tradie that prefers Quality

       I had one and I would buy another if I win tattslotto…..but only if I win Tattslotto..you need to be Linsay Fox to afford spare parts

  • Roger Morrison

    Hello boys and girls, I was given a BT50GT dual cab manual for a Sunday test drive….I want a freestyle /xtra cab. I have a 2007 SR 4×4 Hilux T/D single cab and I use it for work as a finance guy and home handyman SINK ( single income no kids ). I drove about 500 klms today and my other car is a 2007 Porsche GT3. I love driving and have had a lot of cars….and I love having a ute.
    My first impressions were WOW great ride, bloody awesome phone kit with USB so I could charge my Iphone, reasonably comfortable seats ( mind this is a GT and I want a poverty pack space cab…so I was not test driving the seats )….very quiet for a diesel ute which helps with the phone’s performance….lots of power…but likes a few revs…unlike say a V8 diesel cruiser that pulls like a train from just off idle…but no issue….that is one nice engine !
    The six speed manual transmission….hmmm, I hoped I would grow to like it…but after 500 klms (brand new car and had less than 200K when it was given to me)….no….I hate the box…it is vague and spoils an otherwise brilliant vehicle. The engine holds the revs ( actually drops them by a few hundred ) duing changes to keep the car in the power band for the upshift…interesting and mated with a lovely box would be fun.On the highway it is fantastic….sixth is perfect for overtaking…it’s right at the start of the grunt….no suggestion of changing down for passing…so country drivers, the six speed manual would be fine.
    From what I have read the six speed auto is the go…well worth $2K more…and money I would gladly spend…..but alas not yet available in a space cab.
    Coupla other gripes…..the fuel filler cover ” fell off”at a fuel stop, fit and finish of the interior was not up to Jap Mazda standards ( Made in Thailand ). The battery positive terminal cover fitted poorly and was actually about to fall off….I refitted it…but a zip tie seemed to be preventing it from being perfect.
    I was questioned about the vehicle three times at various stops….that is uncommon in a ute….this is a brilliant vehicle make no mistake…..but can I learn to love that box….hmmmm.

    Roger Morrison

  • Antoineism

    If the BT50 had the smoked projecterized headlight styling of a Mazda 6, a painted grille, and Mazda 6 patterned tailights, it would actually be a good looking brute

  • Ken

    I am a return buyer – traded in my old 2008 for the newby and wish I had kept the old one even with all of its faults and shortcomings.
    As with the old model I really have to wonder how Mazda ever arrive at their fuel consumption figures for their cars. This new 3.2lt is as thirsty as my old Toyota Hilux D was and that thing needed a fuel tanker following to get across the Simpson.
    As a member of a club I am in contact with many other owners and not a single one of us have ever come close to getting the advertised fuel consumption that Mazda is advertising. Not in our old models nor in the couple of new ones that have been bought.
    Some other issues I am hoping have been rectified are the terrible clutchplate/pressure plate/flywheel problems of the old model and of course the terribly weak chassis that is prone to fractures near the spring hanger.
    Otherwise comfort is fine – on road performance except for fuel consumption is fine – but off road leaves a lot to be desired – not really a serious off road vehicle but probably not really meant to be except in the sales blurb of the sellers.
    A lot of noise and rattles in the cab and the suspension should be left on the motorways and never taken off road.
    Prices are getting up in the range where we do expect a lot more than what Mazda are giving and all but one of the club members who have bought the new model are seriously considering getting out of Mazda and going to the Isuzu DMax

    • Mick

      Hi Ken,
      that sounds pretty interesting overall for your review… Have you done any mods for suspension system or are your running standard kit?
      I agree with fuel use so I reakon chip and/or exhaust (mandrel, seriously, just spend the money for the benefit, it pays itself off in 4 years – yes, I worked out economy on real figures @ 25000km/y not brochure hokum’).
      As for serious 4×4, what do you consider “Serious” 4×4? Most people wouldn’t know what that is, let alone the correct time to ask the question “do I really need to go there”. We looked at the Isuzu DMax and it felt like we got out of our 05′ Rodeo, into a new… Rodeo… ‘couldn’t do it, but we really liked the our old Rodeo as a middle of the road 4×4. Perhaps this is where the Bt’ will fit in the market (???)

  • Dean

    I’ve got a Dual Cab 3.2 Auto.  Fuel consumption around town has never gone over 10L per 100k.  I’m not easy on the throttle !  Highway it drops into the 7′s.  Mine has 7000k on it now.  The only thing I’m not happy with is it sometimes lags when taking off and I swear you wait 1-1.5 seconds before it takes off.  I’m not sure if it’s a problem with the Auto Torque convertor or electronic engine management switching into economy mode but it gives me the sh$ts big time.  It’s not all the time which leads me to believe it engine management related.  I may chip it and see if it improves.

    • GT buyer

      There is suppose to be fix for the flat spot you are talking about. I know a guy who just had his serviced and they had to take it i again to update the computer to fix the flat spot. Talk to your Mazda Dealer. Looking forward to my New GT model turning up it comes with a power pack for the front seats onlt thing is they can’t tell me if its only the drivers seat or both front seats

  • Michael

    Lag huh? We have the Manual so response as up to you on that point. We “took on” a Landcruiser V8 the other night, It wan’t tidy finish for the ‘cruiser. I reakon the biggest issue I have is the shift between gears, gently gently is the words I suggest through the gates, but I note yours is an auto…

    Dean, I reakon if you chip it you’ll notice a big difference, the only other thing I can think of is the “brake assist engages” at a certain angle (I think on surfaces of +/- 7 degrees – it removes the need for handbrake hill starts, which you probably know about). Perhaps you could investigate?

  • Springbnk2j

    I have heard the new ranger has a major flaw in it’s electronics. You cannot add any extras as in spotlights’ dual batteries, etc, as the extra load will burn out the computer. I was a big fan of the ranger, an wanted a wildtrak. Now i am looking at the bt50. The bt50 has a better range of accessories than the ranger. I myself didn’t like the looks of the bt50, but seeing them with the steel roo bar fitted, gives it a more agressive look. As for the ranger, i am yet to see one on the road with any extras on it(spotlights).But we will see what ford does to fix it, otherwise it’s i pretty town car.

  • Gezza

    Just bought a second hand 2006 (Nov) BT50, SDX, 4X4, manual, 153000km, Ironman bullbar, side steps, Narva lights, CB, Mazda canopy (TJM), two tone paint, Reece HD hitch, interior in very good condition, back seats have hardly been used, needs new tyres, $19500.  Has a minor leak in the tranfer case and alternator sounds as though the bearing is on the way out but it drives magnificently.  It is easy to find myself at 70km/h before I know it.  I figure I may have paid about $500 – 750 to much, but these vehicles are hard to find in the west.  I spent 6 months looking.  I just need to get it off road to see how it performs, but on the tar it feels magnificent. I’m guessing this ute was about $35K new + canopy say $2300 + bullbar $900, lights $100, radio $100.
    I hope that helps on the resale topic.
    I just have to go home and check for fractures near the spring hangers as that was not on my checklist when I checked it over.  Thanks to Ken’s tip.  Heres hoping I dont get a surprise.

    • Thisldo

      watch out for the dual mass clutch, not the best for towing. got rid of my 2008 twin cab 4×4 canopy bullbar new mags and at’s 90ks like new only had enough of the clutch 2nd one
      got no cracks on tranfer case play in steering though also brake are not the best . Sorry to say Gazza you paid to much I got  21k trade in on a new XTR 4×4 Auto sports canopy Mazda Towbar Brake controler
      No BullBar yet to see one I like. The mazda one bends to eazy  looked at the ford only offered 17K and no discount on car (that added to about 12k )

      • Gezza

        Hi Thisldo
        Thanks for the feedback.
        What was the rego, so I can keep an eye out for it online to see what they mark it up to in the car yards.

  • Gezza

    Thankfully no cracks in the chassis, but the transfer case is starting to leak at a reasonable rate.  Has anyone had issues with a leaking transfer case (front) and if so do you recall the repair options and amounts.

  • vswoo

    Wow…. All that information about the BT50 was interesting reading. Sounds like it’s a favourite with most. We were set to get the Hilux SR5 but after taking it for a drive we weren’t impressed – not for the money they were asking for.Instead we left a deposit on a new 2012 BT50 TD GT. I’m not sure if we got a good deal so was hoping someone could make me feel better about what we paid.The extras on the BT50 included a hard cover, nudge bar, sports bar, tow bar, tinting, back ute mat and weather shields. Drive away price $59,500. Is that a good price or did we get ripped off?

    • GT Buyer

      No sounds pretty fair I am purchasing a New GT at the moment and will be paying $57000 & I’m getting a soft cover, snorkel, sports bar, tow bar, hard tray & tailgate liner, rubber floormats, and a power pack which is power front seat adjustment which is a new inclusion. I can’t wait I should get it by the end of the month. I just couldn’t justify buying the Hilux SR5 over the BT-50

  • vswoo

    Unfortuately I couldn’t get the dealer to throw in the floor mats. I’m still insisting though. We did ask about the automatic seat adjustment and he said that Mazda was looking to include it on the ones being assembled now. The car is being imported and may or may not have the automatic seat adjustment when it arrives. Did that cost extra? We couldn’t justify buying the Hilux either. The interior was nothing to look at and it and the driving doesn’t compare with the BT-50.

  • Doug

    Decided on the BT50 GT.  Has anyone thought about the height of the radio ariel for a low garage.  It will be fine entering the garage (ariel slopes back), but what about exiting the garage with the ariel having to bend.
    Has anyone identified an option or a replacement ariel or other modification

  • Thisldo

    Swap it with a stubby arial I swapped it with the one on the bosses honda

  • Gaetano

    Hi all I Purchased bt50 xrt 2011 ademo with 9000 ks sports bar tow bar, tinted windows hard cover
    for $46000

    very happy towing caravan 2.6 ton 14l per 100ks

    I do not think there a better anywhere or better tow 4×4 for that value

    Gaetano

  • Garry

    We have a 2.2lt ranger at work, a twin cab auto. It’s ok, but the thing is slow to start moving from a stop. Once moving, it’s ok but but it’s never going to win at the traffic lights. Lopes along happily at 100, could happily run up some decent km in one of these. Pulling out into a busy road would be umm interesting..

    We had an oil leak (approx 7000km) at the front of the engine. Was at the timing chain cover. But get this, the timing chain cover is a disposable part, had to be ordered in – none in WA. That’s right, no such thing as a timing cover gasket, and Ford didn’t carry the part!

    It gets a buzzy vibration sometimes above the right driver’s air vent, but a sharp tap with a fingertip usually stops it. But this was from new, not a thrashed offroader..

    Maybe the Mazda is better built, but I suspect there is too much DNA shared with the Ford to escape..

    I’m very interested in the new Dmax, looks ok.

    I currently drive a FG Mk2 XR6 ute, be glad to get rid of it.

  • Swandmmfinger

    Hi. We’re looking for a new dual cab tray back for farm work : need to put 1 ton Chep pallets on the tray, taking the kids along with us, and towing a horse float.
    The Mazda BT50s sound good … but wondering if they are worth the extra $10,000 over the Tritions??? Any suggestions??
    (We have always been Toyota people, but are over them. Too expensive, not enough features, out dated, problems witth electrics & suspension).
    Thanks for your help!

    • Robzau

      ha..lol.. just got rid of a triton, broke down twice on a long country run… not pleasant getting home at 3:30am..got my GT BT50 and “love THIS car”.. not “that” one!, as a novice 4wdriver took it to shark bay for a week and it was magic, didnt let us down once on any terrain, even got it fairly well scratched and it buffed out with hardly any noticeable marks (gold paintwork), and as for the nose darting into corners didnt find that at all, even cruising at 125kph it was effortless.

  • Jimeon

    OMG this new BT 50 is superb for everyday driving in the city and a breeze over speed bumps!  Cornering is among the best of the pickups!  Photos of it does no justice until one sees it in the flesh and how one appreciates it. The only alternative for us is the Ford Ranger.
    I wont touch a VW because of atrocious resale value and cost in spare parts.

  • Pda80008

    Waiting to get my nissan pathfinder out of the workshop [currently getting a brand new motor in it at 120.000 klm cost $12.800 among other problems i have had in the past 6 mths] spent more time broken down in that time than its been going. As soon as it comes home will be trading it in. I need something with some grunt to pull a tandem 3.5 t trailer the mazda bt 50 is looking pretty good to me [top of the very short lists]. To all you tradies, farmers etc out there looking to but a new ute/suv, etc by pass nissan [absolute rubbish].

  • Davies

    MyMAZDA Bt-50 NEW ute just stops any where any time REAL LEMON but it will kill some if they keep giving it me back

Mazda BT-50 Specs

BOSS B2500 DX : 2.5L DIESEL TURBO F/INJ - 5 SP MANUAL - C/CHAS
Car Details
Make
MAZDA
Model
BT50
Variant
BOSS B2500 DX
Series
09 UPGRADE
Year
2011
Body Type
C/CHAS
Seats
3
Engine Specifications
Engine Type
DIESEL TURBO F/INJ
Engine Size
2.5L
Cylinders
DIESEL TURBO 4
Max. Torque
330Nm @  1800rpm
Max. Power
105kW @  3500rpm
Pwr:Wgt Ratio
73.1W/kg
Bore & Stroke
93x92mm
Compression Ratio
18
Valve Gear
DUAL OVERHEAD CAM
Drivetrain Specifications
Transmission
5 SP MANUAL
Drive Type
4x2
Final Drive Ratio
3.416
Fuel Specifications
Fuel Type
DIESEL
Fuel Tank Capacity
70
Fuel Consumption (Combined)
8.3L / 100km
Weight & Measurement
Kerb Weight
1436
Gross Vehicle Weight
4500Kg
Height
1622mm
Length
4841mm
Width
1715mm
Ground Clearance
181mm
Towing Capacity
Brake:2250  Unbrake:750
Steering & Suspension
Steering Type
BALL & NUT - POWER ASSISTED
Turning Circle
12
Front Rim Size
6.5x15
Rear Rim Size
6.5x15
Front Tyres
215/70 R15
Rear Tyres
215/70 R15
Wheel Base
2985
Front Track
1445
Rear Track
1450
Front Brakes
DISC - VENTILATED
Rear Brakes
DRUM
Standard Features
Comfort
Air Conditioning
Control & Handling
15 Inch Alloy Wheels
Driver
Power Steering
Entertainment
Radio CD with 2 Speakers
Exterior
Power Mirrors
Interior
Cloth Trim, Power Windows
Safety
Dual Airbag Package, Seatbelts - Pre-tensioners Front Seats
Security
Central Locking Remote Control, Engine Immobiliser
Optional Features
Comfort
Bucket Seats
Exterior
Aluminium Tray
Safety
Anti-lock Braking
Other
Service Interval
6 months /  10,000 kms
Warranty
36 months /  100,000 kms
VIN Plate Location
11-Q-6
Country of Origin
THAILAND