Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review

Hyundai i40 Tourer: 2.0-litre GDI (Gasoline Direct Injection) petrol engine 130kW/213Nm or 1.7-litre CRDi diesel engine 100kW/320Nm with a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic transmission


Hyundai i40 Tourer Active 1.7-litre CRDi diesel with six-speed automatic transmission: $36,490 (Manufacture’s List Price)
Hyundai i40 Tourer Premium 2.0-litre GDI petrol with six-speed automatic transmission: $44,490 (Manufacturer’s List Price)

On looks alone, the Hyundai i40 Tourer is a winner. It’s also loaded with more luxury kit than most Euro cars costing twice its price, and the leather and materials used throughout the cockpit are as good as, if not better than, those used by the premium Japanese automotive marques.

Hyundai is still very much a fast-moving automotive giant (indeed, it’s the fastest growing car company in the world) with no less than a 5.2 per cent share of the global market. At the start of 2011 the company announced a global sales target of 3.9 million vehicles across 5300 dealerships. It’s on track to exceed that target. Moreover, it remains the fifth-largest carmaker in the world with manufacturing facilities and design studios spread over several continents.

Penned under the watchful eye of Hyundai’s chief designer, German born Thomas Bürkle, the i40 Tourer is a stunning looking vehicle from any angle. Far more European in its styling than any other design from the Korean manufacturer, the view from the rear three-quarter angle is especially pretty.

Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review

For me, there are certain similarities to the C-Class Estate, with the tapered roofline and the central styling line that swoops from front to back.

That’s hardly surprising when you learn that Thomas had previous positions with Volkswagen and BMW. He also told us that one of his favourite cars is the beautiful Mercedes-Benz SL-Class Pagoda roof model of 1963, which he used to sketch during his childhood.

Hyundai is the first to admit the i40 Tourer has been designed and created with Europe in mind. The 28 EEC markets that the company operates in have so far accounted for 208,000 units this year, and are on track to achieve a total of 360,000. Those numbers translate into a 2.8 per cent market share and while that’s significantly down on the global share figure, it also highlights the level of growth possible on the continent and the importance of the Euro-styled i40 to push those numbers and share further north.

If you like what Hyundai has done with the exterior styling, then you’re going to love the i40’s interior. It’s not just the ultra contemporary design of the facia and centre stack, it’s as much about the sheer quality of the materials and surfaces that have been used throughout this car. It all feels first-class and certainly on par with the best Japanese brands, if not some of those more aspiring marques from Europe.

In fact, even though I was fairly sure that my colleague and I had secured the base model Active variant, the level of kit and touch and feel of the materials had us both wondering if we had in fact slipped into the mid-spec Elite model. Equipment such as electric parking brake (just pull on a small button and hey presto, the hand brake is on), or the keyless entry, LED daytime running lights, paddle shifters, side bending lights, auto headlights, Bluetooth audio steaming and phone connectivity, nine airbags, and the list goes on…

Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review

The easy way to tell the Active model from its Elite and Premium siblings is by the lack of front fog lights and if you have a keen eye, the 16-inch alloys as apposed to 17-/18-inch wheels for each step up on the trim level ladder

Although the Active gets keyless entry, it misses out on push-button start, but frankly, that’s no big deal. There’s a stack of other standard kit on board that should keep you entertained.

From an exterior perspective, the Hyundai i40 isn’t what you would call a large wagon, more of a compact sports tourer. Inside, however, it’s deceptively large through clever design. Of special mention is the rear-seat legroom: it’s better than ‘Premium Economy’ and that’s with the driver’s seat set up for my normal driving position. Those folks behind the front seat passenger have it even better.

The fabric seats are well bolstered (including rear seats) on the back and seat cushion with a 60:40 rear seat split in two steps. Luggage space is massive. Try 553 litres of load space with the rear seats up and a van-like 1719 litres when folded. That’s enough for bikes, boards, or plenty of scuba gear.

There’s a full size spare wheel too and although that’s something we consider mandatory in Australia, it’s a feature that’s becoming all too rare these days, especially on many of the European models. They tend to use space saver tyres or cans of goo in the interest of reducing weight and utilising more useable space and that’s something Hyundai hasn’t had to compromise on with the i40.

Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review

Hyundai likes to do everything in-house. That goes for engines, transmissions and even the steel it uses for body panels. Yes, it is the only car manufacturer in the world that produces its own steel, which many in the industry believe is the best ultra-high-tensile steel in the business. It’s also one of the reasons why the i40 weighs in from as low as 1420kg for the Active petrol manual. Even the 1.7-litre CRDi diesel-powered versions start at a low 1495kg. It’s a high-tech diesel powertrain too, with direct injection and a variable geometry turbo with an exhaust gas recirculation cooler, which produces 100kW and 320Nm. On paper, the torque band seems a little narrow from 2000-2500rpm, but let’s see how it drives…

There’s a six-speed automatic transmission to put the power down, and again, that’s designed and built by Hyundai technicians and engineers in-house. You can leave in it auto mode or use the paddle shifters for more driver engagement.

Even the remote key is more substantial and a nicer design than any previous Hyundai vehicle, which is clearly an indication that the i40 is regarded as flagship model in the company line-up.

As diesels go, especially those with a small displacement, this unit is on the quiet side. From inside the cabin, there’s very little intrusion of that common diesel clatter. It’s there all right, but it’s heavily muffled. Clearly Hyundai has paid close attention to its NVH management and the abolishment of unwanted noises in the cockpit.

Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review

Hard acceleration onto an open country road reveals little to no turbo lag, certainly nothing to complain about, and there is reasonably good pick-up through to the 100km/h speed limit. Time to hit the neatly positioned Sport button, which I suspect will hold the gear ratios a little longer, but within a few minutes I’ve resorted to the paddle shifters as we come across a few nice bends.

While the automatic transmission is smooth, it’s noticeably slow to upshift. It doesn’t feel quite so slow on the downshift into corners. It won’t be an issue for the vast majority of drivers, but I can only hope Hyundai is well on the way to producing its proprietary dual-clutch transmission for even more driver enjoyment.

There are no such gripes in the ride and handling department. Hyundai has that down pat this time. The i40 on the same level as the Hyundai i30 in this regard and that’s a big call.

The chassis feels wonderfully stiff, especially for a vehicle of such dimensions. Throw it into a corner at speed and the car tracks exactly where you point it. Steering is courtesy of Speed-sensitive Motor-Driven Power Steering (MDPS) and while it’s nice and light at low speed for those urban parking duties, as soon as you are moving along at anywhere near the national speed limit, there’s plenty of weight and feel in the steering from dead centre to full lock.

Find yourself a quiet stretch of ‘S’ curves and this family Tourer will put a decent smile on your face.

There’s some predictable understeer if you carry too much speed into a corner, but that’s mostly about the additional 70-odd kilos over the front end of the diesel engine over the all-alloy petrol unit. Nonetheless, the i40 feels wonderfully agile and great fun to drive.

Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review

One thing is for sure, there’s little or no body lean into these corners even when you’re pushing on with a fair old dollop of enthusiasm. That’s down to a new front suspension setup and some extensive local tuning of these components on Australian roads. Local technicians at Hyundai Australia looked at springs, shocks, stabilisers and bump stops and how they performed over a range of different road surfaces for the best possible ride and handling package for the i40.

The result is hard to fault. Exceptional handling with high levels of pliancy for a cushioned ride over the worst of surfaces. This is a very comfortable ride, particularly for a wagon.

If I have an issue with this car, it is that the chassis is so damn good that it feels underwhelmed by this engine, notwithstanding its ultra frugal nature. But an i40 Tourer with Hyundai’s 2.0L R-Diesel engine would be something very special indeed. Power and torque would be increased to 135kW and 392 Nm respectively and that folks would mean some serious overtaking ability, but without giving too much away in terms of additional fuel consumption. We’ve even got a badge for it – the i40 RD.

We then hopped into the more lavishly appointed i40 Premium with the 2.0-litre GDI petrol engine, mated to the same six-speed automatic transmission.

If I had an issue with lacklustre mid-range torque from the diesel, it’s an even bigger issue with the petrol engine. It might be direct injection and the latest creation from the ‘Nu’ engine family, but with 130kW and just 213Nm of torque to call on at 4700 rpm – you need to make sure you are well and truly revving this engine before you decide to overtake another car. You’ll need to leave yourself plenty of distance too, because there is precious little grunt to call upon.

Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review

Any criticism I have for the i40 powertrains needs to be carefully tempered with the fact that the principle market for this vehicle is Europe and over there, less is best when it comes to engine displacement.

So which i40 would we choose? That’s a tough question because although the diesel has the grunt, it’s also significantly heavier over the front end.

The i40 GDI petrol responds amazingly well at speed through some of the more bendy stretches of road and better exploits the superb ride and handling prowess of this car.

From a trim level perspective, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with the entry-level Active, given the extensive standard features inventory laid on in the i40. But with the i40 Premium, Hyundai has thrown in everything but the kitchen sink. There are more than a few luxury automotive brands at close to twice its price that don’t have this level of creature comforts, not to mention nine airbags. Things like heated and cooled front seats in a high-quality leather, heated seats in the rear, electric folding mirrors, HID headlamps with adaptive front lighting, panoramic glass roof with power one-touch function, rear-view camera, luggage rail and cargo net, as a sample of the kit on this variant. The glaring omission from the entire i40 line-up is the lack of an integrated Sat Nav system as part of a large centrally mounted touchscreen. Hyundai says it’s working on a system but can’t tell us when it might be available.

Hyundai will sell plenty of i40 Tourers as it’s an exceptionally good all-round package with loads of features and ultra-low fuel consumption to boot.

Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review
Hyundai i40 Review

 




  • Wagonator

    My Mazda 6 Wagon suddenly looks ancient, both design and features list wise.. Well done Hyundai!

    • FrugalOne

      No, not at all, lets not compare a old model Mazda6 with a all new just released hyundai

      I KNOW the new Skyactive powertrain in the Mazda6 is going to hit this korean for “6″

      If you think Japan Inc. is going to let the koreans walk all over them you understand jack.

      • idlebrain

        Hmmm,

        Skyactive 2.0(l) Mazda3 113kw/194NM
        SkyActive-D 2.2 Mazda6 136kw/420NM

        Hyundai 2.0 GDI i40 130kw/213NM
        2.2 Diesel R Santafe 145kw/421NM

        What’s so special about the skyactive?

        • FrugalOne

          Its called a overall package

          All your doing is showing “brochure horsepower”

          Mazda have ZoomZoom, MX5 and RX8, pure sports pedigree

          • FrugalOne

            I will leave the last word to this website CARADVICE:

            x = “Lacklustre engines”

            NEXT!

          • AndyGF

            LOL… Mazda has ‘ZoomZoom’… ROFLMAO! And ‘PURE pedigree’ ~AAAAHAHAHAHA!

            That wouldn’t even work down at the pub mate. I would have to be sooooo drunk!

            PS: that like saying mcdonalds is better because at least it has ronald? Oh-Kay…

          • idlebrain

            Overall package?

            “I KNOW the new Skyactive powertrain in the Mazda6 is going to hit this korean for “6″”

            Who said this one…. me?

        • http://baji192.wordpress.com Baji

          The thing thats special about SkyActiv is:

          A holistic approach to efficiency, refinement and engineering.

          SkyActiv-Diesel: although its power and torque figures might be lower than the 2.2 R-Type diesel, the R-Type diesel can’t match the SkyActiv-Diesel for refinement and realword driveability. The SkyActiv-Diesel redlines at 5300RPM!!! and its powerband is FAR greater than the R-Type diesel.

          SkyActiv-G: these engines were never designed for bragging rights regarding power and torque (both of which it has adequately), but for a wider powerband and unmatched fuel economy.

          having said that, not much can be said at the moment about the new Mazda6, because there has been no official statements regarding it. For all we know, mazda could have something up their sleeves, and may well bump up the power and torque figures to bring it to the top of the class. And with the next 6 being a global model (US included), there might be a real possbility that the MPS6 makes a return.

          Great effort by Hyundai though, sat in an i40 at AIMS and it was by far the best hyundai i’d ever been in. Quality product.

          • Henry

            FrugalOne Hyundai will have the Genesis Coupe and the Veloster…

          • Rick

            I’m sorry but have you driven the Santa fe or just making an assumption based on the badge on the front of the car . I drove the old diesel mazda cx7 2010 and it didn’t come close and until I drive a sky active I’ll reserve judgement . However I can attest to the Hyundai . it’s power train was enough for me to actually sell a Toyota prado to get one and I haven’t looked back ,it’s been incredible ,continuously returns fuel figures in the 6.0l/100 km and tows my race car around with ease and the trailer loaded up with car and equipment weighs exactly 1976kg according to the weigh bridge at the silo and on top of that its always with 6 people in the car and all the crap that goes with a weekend away . Case in point if anyone lives near Brisbane they will know what I mean .on the Cunningham hwy , Cunningham gap the Hyundai didn’t get below 90 km/h except for a couple of 50ish km/h corners try doing that in your Mazda and if you succeed let me know.

          • Rick

            I’d love to see the mps 6 make a return excellent car zoom zoom

          • Rick

            Can’t wait till the genisis arrives as long as it’s priced properly ,around the 40k mark is reasonable

  • maximark

    Beautifully designed both exterior and interior but underpower for its size, it needs to have 2.2r diesel engine from the Santa Fe or at least the 2R engine from IX35 as Anthony mentioned. Also the petrol model need a 2.4l engine from the i45 to be a a safe car for highway overtaking and also to justify the prices. Fair and honest review regarding to power performance. Cheers Anthony.

    • http://www.facebook.com/priusfreezone Matthew Werner

      Or the 2 litre turbo that sees duty in the i45 & Kia Optima in the US (if it was engineered for RHD vehicles)

      • Rick

        I’d like to see that happen the turbo motor is getting some good reviews and after owning the Santa fe now for 18 mths it’s 2.2r motor should be in every Hyundai it’s incredible

  • Naughtyius Maximus

    Lacklustre (spell mistake)

    • mmmmm

      spell-ING mistake – if you want to be THAT picky at least be accurate

      • Naughtyius Maximus

        Corrected already you nong

  • FrugalOne

    Silly coin, very very silly ask.

    The world has gone crazy, hyundai are in lala land with its prices, and yet GENUINE VW [ie not scoda] are getting cheaper and cheaper and more competive.

    Not paying over Japper coin for korean, not now, not ever, they need to be told, they are a Geely/GreatWall fighter, nothing more

    • The Voice of Reason

      Perhaps you need to take a closer look at one or perhaps (shock horror) even drive one, before making those kinds of judgments.

      The Koreans have come a mighty long way from the crappy Excels of a few years ago…

      This is why they are feared by the rest of the motoring world… they are going to do what the Japanese did, but in a much shorter space of time.

      How long ago were Kia regarded as third class rubbish? Look at some of the designs that Peter Schreyer (ex Audi design) is turning out for them – these are some of the best looking cars on the road.

      Those of us who have lived long enough remember when no one wanted a crappy Japanese car – now they are highly sought after.

      I think you will find within a couple of years you might even be lusting after one yourself, if you decide to give it a fair go and can get over the “stigma” (ie badge snobbery) of owning a Koream car.

      When will VW (and everyone else) back themselves with a 5 year warranty? Before the cynics chime in and say “because Korean cars need them”, consider that such a statement makes no sense. If Korean cars were so unreliable, such long warranties would bankrupt them. However, Hyundai are going from strength to strength as a financial powerhouse.

      That alone must tell you that they must be doing something right.

      • FrugalOne

        Yes, they have come far fast, all they did was buy market share

        But they are in a panic, because in the mirror is the largest and fastest growing car country in the world, closing in fast….

        Do what the Koreans did, and more, in half the time, the GW Utes are going gang busters

        The biggest problem is the Japanese keep dishing us up in Australia the cheapest basic models, unlike in Japan where you can get brilliant models and features

      • Sumpguard

        All so very true. My old man’s Elantra had just hit 11 and done nearly 200,000 k’s and not a single thing (besides the battery and one blown headlamp globe has gone wrong). He now owns an ix35.

        Yep the resale now is next to nothing but with 6 years of motoring trouble free outside the warranty period I think the resale can be forgiven. If they keep up their efforts on the reliability (and their reputation in this area is become renowned) then they will enjoy a resale similar to toyota’s soon enough.

        Meanwhile their interiors are now some of the best looking out there and the outside of the cars is improving with each model. I prefer the blue lighting to the red in my Sportage.

        No wonder the rest of the auto world are worried! Toyota were the first company, followed by Honda to admit as much. The distance both Hyundai and KIA have come in just the past two years is staggering.

        I agree that the wagon needs the larger diesel as an option. Particularly in our market. However if it had a ford or holden badge on it no-one would be bickering on the price!!

        • FrugalOne

          Resale is rubbish on ALL cars, sure its a bit better on BigT products, but you are paying more for it in the beginning, so it evens out.

          Lasting 200,000km is nothing special, with the age of computers and technology, ALL cars are way over engineered and pretty much bullet proof, when was the last time you saw a modern car broken down?

          • Sumpguard

            A client’s 2009 VW Golf GTi had a new transmission put in it earlier this year after leaving them stranded 650 km’s from home on the roadside. I think that qualifies as a breakdown. No more VW’s for them. Back to Japanese or Korean was his last comment!

            My D40 broke down twice due to injector problems in its first year on the road with less than 15,000 km’s on the clock.

            A mate’s D22 stuck part of the engine through the block with under 20,000 k’s and apparently it was renowned for it. Hence why they pulled it for several months whilst detuning the 2.5 diesel from the D40.

            A business colleague in Airlie Beach had a brand new motor replaced in his $130,000 range rover due to an “unresolved tapping” in the engine.

            My old man’s mate’s 5 series beemer spent more time in the shop than on the road due to endless electrical problems.

            There’s just a few examples. I’m sure I’m not the only person in this forum that knows of newish vehicles having significant failings!

          • Gen Y

            A family member owns an Audi A3 Quattro and breathes a sigh of relief every time he calls on the extended warranty he bought. He reckons the stupid thing would have cost him $4,000 in repairs this year if he hadn’t bought the extended warranty. Said family member has had nothing but trouble with Audi and VW – both reputable brands. Go figure.

          • youknowitstrue

            on my way to work a couple of days ago… a couple of year old xr6 being loaded onto a flatbed!

          • http://caradvice OSU811

            Hyundai would be very hard to beat for reliability imo, and if you look at re-sale as a percentage of purchase cost (the only fair way to judge) Hyundai would be as good as Toyota, Mazda, Nissan, Honda etc! And certainly a LOT better than Saab, Renault, Citreon, Alfa Romeo etc etc.

        • Don Quay

          My nephew had an Elantra of around that vintage. When it was out of warranty, the engine computer died and the car was practically undriveable, the engine was rough and misfired. It stalled continuously and was dangerous to take on the road. The price of a new computer was over $3500 and the trade in value was so bad, the repairs were going to cost more than the car was worth. A five year old was only worth scrap value. No mention is made in these tests of the price of spare parts on these cars. They used to “Flog ‘em cheap” and hit with the spare parts and service prices.

      • Nath746

        “…or perhaps (shock horror) even drive one…”

        FrugalOne is not old enough yet to drive

    • Trevor

      There are some auto manufacturers in Europe offering 5 year unlimited warranty on their vehicles, and these same cars in Australia only have 3 year 999,999k warranties? We pay through the nose for most European vehicles when you compare the same vehicle sold in the good old USA. One has to ask why? A five year unlimited warranty is certainly a strong reason to buy Korean. I am old enough to remember when Japanese cars were crap. However when you look at all the bells and whistles these cars had, Australian and USA built vehicles were not much better than the T model Ford.

  • FrugalOne

    Oh, and it would be nice, just for reference, to know what sort of milage [MPG] these alleged high-tech donks get in the real world driving enviroment

    • http://www.caradvice.com.au Anthony Crawford

      CarAdvice will carry out a fuel consumption test before the end of the year with both engines for that purpose.

      • Sumpguard

        Anthony can we get a piccie of the remote you mentioned up there please?

        • http://www.caradvice.com.au Anthony Crawford

          see what I can do, they didn’t have one in the launch kit but I was struck by how nice it was to touch.

        • http://www.caradvice.com.au Anthony Crawford

          Done and posted in the review.

          Thanks

          • Sumpguard

            Cheers.

      • Jerrycan

        Now that will be interesting!
        My experience is that Hyundai’s rarely get what they claim for fuel consumption. I have owned a couple from new and can get close to the claims but never better.
        It is obviously the marketing dept not the laboratory that control the claims. Diesels are closer to claims than petrol though.
        Even Kia have more realistic claims, and they use the same engines.
        Eg 1.6 diesel manual is used in I30 and Kia Soul. The Soul is substantially lighter and so should have better consumption figures, especially around town, but apparently good physics shouldn’t get in the way of good marketing.
        I have always bettered fuel consumptions claims on other brands I have owned.
        Good to hear they have fixed the ride/handling problems of earlier models although I think that more power is not necessarily good as it will probably introduce the really bad torque steer affecting their Santa Fe R.

        Reading the I40 review, if overtaking manuevers are difficult with the claimed light body and power outputs, then someone is telling porkies.

        • Sumpguard

          Both my ix35 and now my Sportage (both diesels) use/used around 15-20 percent more than claimed. However both have run continually with the aircon on (Cairns) which I am told accounts for around 12 percent of your juice on average.

          The ix35 had done just 8,000 k’s when sold and my Sportage has just clicked over 4,000 so I reckon it should be pretty close to the money when it loosens up which according to other posters in the ix35 thread is up around 25,000 k’s. They also claim that their’s are achieving very close to the claimed figures (again the diesel ones) now they have freed up.

          It’s on the highway where the diesel really shines though.

        • Rick

          The best we’ve seen in the Santa fe manual was 5.2l/100km between goodiwindi and springsure sitting on 110km/h ish with 6 people and all the crap needed for 2 weeks away . worse figure a trip to Brisbane towing close to 2tonnes worth of car and equip and it was 10.8l/100km. still over 600km covered on a tank i thought that was pretty good hope this helps anyone who wants to know

          • Jerrycan

            Rick,
            I think you just happen to have a particularly good model.
            I have an auto model R and cannot get close to your figures. The auto box should not make any difference at a highway speeds because it will be ‘locked’.
            My experience at a true (GPS confirmed) 110 kph in still conditions, no load and relatively flat roads (quite a few in SA) is 7.5ltr/100km. A reasonably good figure, but yours are sensational
            Other forums confirm my consumption is about the average.
            Don’t like to be a doubting Thomas but have you checked your car for speedo accuracy and distance?
            My old 2001 V6 Santa fe was 10% optimistic on speed and 6% overporting on distance so my crap fuel consumption was crappier than I first realised! When I did a real 110 kph (120 indicated) then fuel consumption was a actually 12l/100 (flat, no wind). Never really forgiven Hyundai for that considering they claimed an official average of 8.5l/100km at the time. Mysteriously later upgraded models consumption increased to 10.3l/100km.

          • matt

            jerrycan…. that would be hyundais first attemp at a ^V6 right? 2.5 or urgraded 2.7 litre… lol you expect an engine that small to be good on fuel in a car like tuscon? shame…

        • Matt

          IN REGARDS TO FUEL CONSUMPTION:
          The sticker on each car that gives fuel statistics are carried out in accordance with certain standards that are outside of the manufacturers control. Therefore every car will realisticly use more the what’s stated and that’s why it’s only a guide. If one car is stated to use less than another, it is 98% likely it will use less, but both will use more then what’s stated on the sticker

        • http://google Moses

          Don’t be so cocky in bagging official fuel figures. I have owned three 4 litre Fords with official figures of 10.8l/100 and almost never achieved better than 13.5/100; two Gen 3 Holdens which could do no better than 19-23/100; one Renult Clio which returned 6.8/100 both city and open road. I currently drive a Grandeur, which has an official 10.8/100 and consistently runs at 9.8-10.4/100 on city cycle. The only other other car I’ve had that returned better than official figures was a 2002 Magna which returned between 7.5 and 10.

      • Blueberry

        Hey Anthony… Do you reckon there is any chance of the 2.2L Diesel or the 2.4 GDI being slotted into the i40? Or is this wishful thinking lol

        • Henry

          FrugalOne, The VW Polo Increased price if u didn’t know…..

  • Naughtyius Maximus

    Any more pics?

    • Naughtyius Maximus

      Far out am I the only one who cynical here or are others blinded…..like way way too many pics on here and whatever thread has as many pics!!!

  • Naughtyius Maximus

    Of glass roof?

    • http://www.caradvice.com.au Anthony Crawford

      There is one pic only of the glass roof in the gallery – it’s huge

      • Jerrycan

        Take it for a drive at midday on a 40C day and then tell me how suitable for Australia these massive glass areas are?
        That’s a general criticism not just aimed at Hyundai.

        • Henry

          It does open and also has proper covers…

          • Sumpguard

            I have THAT roof in my Sportage and with the climate control on it isn’t an issue at all despite one poster saying it would be last year. I live in one of the hottest parts of Australia where the UV hits 18-19 from November to February and despite what appears to be a relatively flimsy pull out blind it was no issue last summer.

          • Sumpguard

            I’m guessing that everyone that voted me down owns the car with the glass roof and has had it through a Cairns summer?

            It is nowhere near as bad as you think.

  • o

    Please Hyundai just put the screen in, it doesnt need to have sat nav just a nice multimedia screen.

  • Dave

    so all these pics and not one of the boot? every time in most articles pics of the boot are missing and who is this car for both the male and the female and who likes to see the boot the females and the family man

    Interesting how the review did not discuss actual fuel consumption figures were there a great deal more than the manufacturer’s estimations?

    • http://www.caradvice.com.au Anthony Crawford

      There is a pic of the boot albeit with a bike in it in the gallery – it gives you an idea.

      • matt

        lol half a shot of the bike and a shot of half the load space???? i can fit a mountain bike into the back of my 323 too… ive said it before stop being slack with pictures

  • m2m

    Such a stunning station wagon. i think owners will have a hard time convincing a*&holes that its a Hyundai. It’s over priced but people purchasing the i40 Tourer were probably looking at spending $45k on their Sportage anyway. R-series diesel would be very nice too!

    I wonder what Peter Schreyer could do with it…

  • Dave L

    I’ll potentially be in the market for a wagon to cater for family mid 2012, and it is nice to see the traditional wagon making a comeback (outside of the SUV space). Was thinking Mazda6 wagon, but need an auto which rules out the diesel, so this may be another option worth looking at.

  • http://caradvice OSU811

    Having driven the auto petrol and diesel now, I can say the Diesel is definately a better drive, much better torque for day to day driving, feels quicker, more responsive and even revs really smooth, does not sound like a diesel from in the car at all.!!! more like a Subaru 4cyl petrol with a nice throbby sound. The petrol engine is ok but does lack low down torque for around town driving imo, the 2.4gdi engine from the I45 would of been better!, But overall a very impressive wagon!!

  • Gianni

    I really wish these stereo-types who think Koreans can’t make cars would shut up and disappear. Hyundai and Kia have upped their game in value, quality and MAYBE even driver involvement. This is a perfectly good car and a perfectly good company.

    • fishman

      Spot on, it just a shame its overpriced on all specs, and no manual available past the base model…

    • Philthy

      I don’t think many people are saying this is not a good car… just that it’s priced very high for what it is.

      • Blueberry

        What you mean for what it is… If it had another badge no-one would question the price. Its not cheap but with the features it has is in no way too expensive imo.

        • nickdl

          Considering you can get a well-equipped Passat for the same money as the Premium, coming with a larger engine and being larger in general, I would call the i40 a bit overpriced. That said, the base model is great value.

          • Sumpguard

            All good if you want to take the risk on the Passat. There is no doubting the quality of the drive in the VW but if I owned one knowing what I know I’d be forever wondering when things might go wrong. After the issues with my Navara I know only too well how it feels to have that thought in the back of your mind.

            VW may have lifted their game and time will tell I guess but to be perfectly honest if I was in the market for a wagon for me personally I’d pay what Hyundai are asking for the peace of mind. Provided of course it suited me after the test drive.

            VW’s are perhaps the only brand that truly tugs at my heart strings. I love the driving experience (based on actually driving them) ,the interior quality is undeniable and I am in no way offended by their styling (a tad bland) but I cannot bring myself to take the risk on them as an owner.

          • Matt

            Why does a bigger engine in the Passat mean anything? It just means it uses more fuel.
            If you want a bigger car, go up a class in size.
            With the i40, your not only paying for the features, but also the warranty, relatively cheap parts when compared to cars like the Passat, and also their all round reliability.

    • http://google Moses

      I’m with you. Before I bought my Grandeur I asked everyone I know who has a Hyundai or has had one in the past. Not one negative comment from any of them.
      My Grandeur is every bit at safe as my work mate’s Audi, has double the boot space, heaps more interior room for five people, far better (standard) sound system, AND it’s cheaper to run, service and insure.
      It just doesn’t have four circles on the grille.
      However, I have more spare cash in my back pocket and a big grin on my face.

  • I Am Always Right

    I have to agree with FrugalOne with the way the pricing is going up fast with all hyundai line up. Elantra for example is overly priced when compared with the other japanese offerings. Japanese cars have a proven track record where as Hyundai is new. It is still early for them to put the prices so high that they match or cross the similar jap offerings.

    • Henry

      Never agree with FrugalOne, He is against every car, he always has something to complain about and I AM ALWAYS AGAINST HIM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      • Henry

        Guys stop being rude i’m only 13…. :( and i love Hyundai’s!

  • XtRmn8

    Will be good to read a more comprehensive review with fuel consumption figures. I am interested in how the manual diesel drivers compared to the auto.

    The Active is a good package but like others have said I think the range should start at $29990 plus on-roads.

    • Rick

      And I reckon the manual should be available across the range not just in the base model

  • xl

    Once again, it’s impossible to find a factory GPS unit in a new Korean car.

  • Joe

    There’s no doubt that Hyundai have come a long way in the past few years but surely the true test of the i45 is when it is compared to similar wagons like the Skoda Octavia, Ford Mondeo and Mazda 6 wagons.
    I would love to see a comparo between the i45 Premium Diesel @ $46,490 and the Mondeo Titanium Wagon @ $48,490 especially when in my opinion the Mondeo Titanium is still the best looking wagon on the market, has all of the Hyundai’s features and also includes things like DSG gearbox,Active Cruise Control,Blind Spot Information System,Lane Departure Warning etc. These features might be scoffed at by some
    Also the i45 is brand new and the Skoda, Mondeo & Mazda are nearing the end of the model lives.

    • fishman

      …and all 3 of those alternatives have more powerful petrol and diesel options, and in the case of the Octavia and Mazda 6 both are significantly cheaper. And both of these have new models coming out next year, which will be a more true comparison…

    • Henry

      I think u mean the i40 or are you acculy talking the SEDAN i45??

    • Rick

      Given that the price of these vehicles seem to be predominant in this comment ,and I’m not sure if it is the focus so I’ll say this anyway. given the sv6 commodore has a price of $49997 in auto form It Is a similar price. It would be interesting to see the differnece in running costs of a diesel mid sizer to the large petrol. Given that there is only 15cm in difference ( Mazda 6) In size . I’m not saying it’s a fair comparison it would be interesting

      • Phil

        Rick, I don’t think you can use the normal RRP Crummer prices as a comparison. Holden (and Ford) have been running massive discounts on their old dinosaurs for years.
        Open any major weekend paper – you’ll find dealers advertising SV6 auto for $34,990 driveaway – and thats before you even go in and start negotiating (for sedan, wagon is $1500 more I think).

        • Rick

          Just curious why do you call them dinosaurs they have independent suspension over head cam motors 6 speed autos and manuals and the commodore has direct injection . for the money I think they are incredible value, especially compared to the cars listed in comments here . And if they are offering them at the price you say , I can’t see why anyone would consider the mid sizers over them ? Maybe I’m missing something ,I’m sure I’m about to be told , and look forward to it .

          • Phil

            People want practical, fuel efficient cars, Crummer and Falcoon use almost twice as much fuel as this Hyundai, yet are barely anymore practical, in fact they’re probably worse as Falcon has no wagon and the Crummer wagon boot isn’t particulary big.
            Most people don’t care what the suspension design is or whether is uses overhead camshafts.
            Interior built quality in the Falcoon and Crummer are awful (not that I’m saying Hyundai are any better).
            Also the Crummer V6 is amazingly slow despite supposedly having 190KW. The 130KW i40 is about 3000kgs lighter than Crummer and is probably just as fast whilst using far less fuel .

  • Joe

    I meant the i40 and not i45. Sorry!!

  • The Voice of Reason Jr.

    FrugalOne is just envious and angry that the looks and features list of a sub $50 000 Hyundai far exceed the looks and features of the B class Merc that he shelled out $200 000 for.

    • MattP

      B Class Mercedes Benz can be obtained for the same price as this Hyundai.

      You clearly know a lot about cars. Not.

      • The Voice of Reason Jr.

        MattP u mad brah?

        • Phil

          Mercedes B class starts at $37,500.

          • http://google Moses

            Still too much money for something that looks like its trying to be a Honda Accord.

  • K.Yusin

    Most people now owns portable GPS unit, and just add extra $200 and get yourself a decent GPS unit. FrugalOne could be Japanese competitor, I can see this guy popping up everytime there’s Korean car reviews, Japs are usually insecure when it comes to Koreans.

  • Byron

    You complain about not having a manual. Be happy you still got one at least. It’s not available in upper-spec models, so then why you don’t you just add all the features of a upper-spec model & look you have an up-spec model in manual.

    • fishman

      How do you do that when the only options are auto and metallic paint?

      Agree base manual is better than nothing (Mondeo), but Mazda and Skoda have more compelling options at better prices with manual transmissions.

      I only comment because I’m in the market for a mid-size wagon next year, and would love to have the i40 on my shopping list. But at these prices its uncompetitive, and that’s before I factor in the poor-mans options offered to those who prefer manual.

      • http://caradvice OSU811

        You can option the upper models 17′ or 18′ wheels and front fog lights!, could also option the cargo cover, barrier net etc! At least with the Wheels and fog lights it would look the same!

        • fishman

          I could really give a monkeys about the wheels and fog lights.

          Main things would climate control, parking sensors, and (possibly) leather seats. As far as I can tell you can’t option any of these.

        • fishman

          I couldn’t really give a monkeys about the wheels and fog lights.

          Main things would climate control, parking sensors, and (possibly) leather seats. As far as I can tell you can’t option any of these.

          • matt

            hey phil you dont need to pay thousands of dollars for a computer and internet connection either…. hint hint.. bugger off

      • fishman

        Just spotted that you can option parking sensors and cameras which is nice, but deffo no climate control :(

        • Phil

          Why do you need climate control?

          It has normal air conditioning.

          How hard is it to turn a knob to “cold/colder” or “hot/hotter” in a normal A/C car?
          It amazes me that people WANT to pay hundereds of dollars extra to dial a temperature in rather than just turning a knob.

          • fishman

            My current car has normal AC, and of course its not hard to turn a knob to control, but I find on a long drive you have to constantly adjust it, and its a distraction to do when when driving (and illegal in some countries eg UK). Its undoubtedly more convenient to set a preferred temperature and then let the electronics do the rest, and having driven a couple of hire cars with this in recently while in europe it was a definite plus.

            You’re comment could apply to almost all gadgets – sure we dont need them, but everyone likes things that make their life that little bit easier….

  • Jiss

    Definitely needs the 2.4L GDI and either 2L or 2.2L CRDI. The 2L GDI and 1.7 CRDI should be in the Elantra and new i30.

  • Ford

    Very nice looking vehicle HOWEVER it is hard to swallow that price tag (especially for a Hyundai).

    • Rick

      Hard to swallow the price on the Hyundai I reckon the price they are asking for all these mid sizers is absolutely criminal

      • alan

        Because they are all overbuilt and full of unnecessary crap. Because people don’t buy them for transport only but for ego. A substitute for their pathetic poor lives bein tax slaves.

      • matt

        indeed rick what happened to the 25990 driveaway mid sizers…. we still have sub 20k “compacts”….

    • http://google Moses

      How much would it cost to get all that gear in a Ford?
      You reckon the Hyundai is overpriced?
      I reckon it would cost you 60 grand to option a Ford up to this standard.

  • Go1

    Well I wouldn’t say this car has the interior quality of Lexus.. This Is on par with the Suzuki Kizashi interior (which is very good btw)

  • nickdl

    Best Hyundai by a mile. The base model is great value and looks fantastic, I love the 18s on the Premium though. Hopefully it really is as good to drive as the review says – it’s about time Hyundai got the suspension and steering right for Australia.

    It’s definitely the first time you’d seriously consider a Hyundai on merit rather than just value-for-money. I’d take it over the Mazda 6, and it would be a tough call against the Mondeo. The Ford has more room, but in the base spec, the i40 is much more appealing.

    I’m not sure about the pricing of the Premium model. It’s expensive for any mid-size 4-cylinder, let alone a Hyundai. For that money you could get a 508, Citroen C5, Passat or Superb wagon. All are well equipped with better performance.

    I’d be waiting if I was going to buy one of these. I’m sure that next year Hyundai will include the sat-nav touchscreen and drop the prices a little. They were quick to lower i20 prices when sales weren’t as good as expected. All in all though, it’s all you’d ever need in a family car, with a lot that you’d want as well.

  • STP

    One of the better looking wagon on the market… wins the show on looks alone… still reckon that it needs a bit more power for a car of this size.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1715760895 Charles Dean

    Hey CA, what camera did you guys use to take those photos?

  • K

    Size of the boot? Photos of the boot area??

    • K

      Btw, that is without the fancy large aperture shot of the bicycle. This isn’t art with that much bokeh.

    • http://www.caradvice.com.au Anthony Crawford

      Pic of the boot in the gallery with a bike in it. That’s all we have but rest assured, it’s huge.

      • matt

        no resting…. your ment to drive the bloody things in detail…. give the fans of car advice something thats worth your steady paycheck

  • Gimp

    Having driven both the diesel and petrol now, the diesel is easily the better engine. Can someone explain too why the turn signals are so damn quiet? You can barely hear them and this was both in an Active and Premium variant.

  • F10r

    I saw the i40 in flesh today.. First impression, its nice.. The back has a nicer design then the front facia..

    But the best looking Hyundai is the Elentra in my opinion.. Especially when it’s driving on the road..

  • http://caradvice Gordon

    Well done Hyundai! Now would you please build a light duty utility and I will buy that.

  • Robin Graves

    Its a pity that Hyundai seem to get it 90% right. The Euro based cars are styled right, handle right but need bigger engines. The yank based cars have big enough engines but lack diesels and are too soft and overstyled. If the cars were 100% then I’d happily hand over the coin they are asking, but not when its not quite there yet.

  • alan

    Another overweight, bloated, heavy, expensive boat, for poor people with bloated egos. You know what, most Aussies who buy this are not even wealthy. Most of them are poor renters and mortgage slaves who don’t even own a house debtfree and have credit debts….

    At 1.6 tonnes, what a shocker. I dont’ believe the fuel economy stated by Hyundai for 1 minute. INDEPENDENT TESTING anyone? Car companies should be held accountable by law for giving wrong fuel consumption.

    what a NO-COMMON-SENSE car again. You won’t see these cars being around second-hand in 15 years. They will all be wrecked early because WAAAAAAY to expensive to keep them maintained and roadworthy. Shed 500kg, make space under the bonnet to keep the repairs affordable!!!

    • nickdl

      I don’t know where to start in pointing out flaws in all of your statments, not can I be bothered.

    • Thorneel

      Your right Alan the i 40 falls well short of those figures.
      Sorry now I bought one!

  • marcelito

    Beautiful design in the photos…like it both inside and out…well done Hyundai

  • Jacob

    Ferrari make their own alloys…

  • Sumpguard

    I had the chance to walk around the one that has just landed at our local dealer at 3.30 am thismorning and it is a sleek ,stylish wagon.

    However and this is only my opinion the elantra parked right alongside it in the same silver looks better designed at the front even without the DLR’s. Again just my personal view!

    The rear of the i40 is possibly the best looking design I have seen on a wagon.

  • Al Juraj

    Design is simply space-age. Just put in the 200+kw 2-litre petrol turbo and (possibly) 4WD and we’ve got the complete car!

  • Trevor

    I wanted to take this car for a test drive, but on putting my foot on the accelerator, I find my size 11 foot was not able to be put fully on the accelerator. If I did I could not reduce the engine revs due to my foot hitting the underneath portion of the dashboard. On trying out the passenger front seat, I was not able to put my feet flat against the firewall due again having the dashboard not giving me enough room to relax properly. As usch, this vehicle was immediately struck off my wanted to buy list.Pity as it is a nice looking car let down by this design oversight.

  • Byron

    I had a look at one of these at my local dealer. Looks like you have kids in car seats, you can’t use the 1st foot of space in the wagon, due to the points for the car seats being in the wagon floor! Hopeless!

  • Mark

    I have been loking at this car as I have been looking for a mid sized wagon to replace my current car.

    I have been looking for a petrol wagon as I do not do sufficient kilometres. The diesel particulate filter would cause me contant problems over the short distance I travel.

    It is a nice car.

    I have over the past few months looked at the following.

    Ford Mondeo Titanium Wagon which I have reservations over a lack of a petrol version.

    Ford Territory. I need a front wheel drive and nothing as big.

    VW Golf customline Estate Wagon. I keep on hearing stories from some of my colleagues about quality of build and  brake pad replacement including rotors at around the 30.000km mark but this could not be confirmed as fact. I own a ten year old Korean car and seem to think panel gaps and finish in the build is superior. VW would run rings around it in the handling department.

    Mazda 6 wagon. It is not as well appointed as the i40.

    Toyota. Nothing available.

    Peugot 308 wagon. I have same reservations as VW.

    The problems I have noticed with the i40 after seeing the car at several dealeships.
    I am looking at buying the i40 petrol Premium Wagon.

    Headroom with sunroof but I am after a car with a sunroof.

    Head room particularly in the rear seat with the sunroof and blind closed. Most dealerships I visited had the roof closed and the blind open. This is a personal opinion based on my 1.79cm height

    Wheel size 18 inch and type of tyre that has a 45 profile. A test drive in a mobnth or two would confirm its suitability for Parramatta Rd Sydney.

    Ground Clearance. My own opinion is it may need an extra 1 to 2 cms above its 14cms to clear a few driveways around Sydney.The Mazda 6 wagon could be slightly lower than this vehicle. I think of this if the car is laden with a load.

    Lack of rear vision through rear window and front vision beyond the end of the bonnet.
    I was taught to drive in the dinosaur era around 1980 and still do not trust the reliability of front and rear sensors and cameras. Unless I am mistaken (I have aftermarket sensors in my current car) objects such as following or wind up against them can throw their distance calculations out.

    The problem about the rear seats not being able to be folded flat in a wagon. If Hyundai can have this feature in my ten year old hatch this is close to unforgiveable.

    It is a very nice well built car from the examples I have seen and is currently on the top of my short list. This will be confirmed after a series of test drives over the  next few months

    The other contenders are out of my price range, too much ground clearance or too big.

  • She Redfoxx

    Buyer beware if your looking at an i40 wagon Petrol then make sure you really test drive it. Include a few up hill terrains, Pitiful.  Try out the Bluetooth function it’s not usable, Dare not try to reverse park straight away until you adapt to the poor front and rear vision, Looks great in and out but that’s where the praise ends. Pure Rubbish and I’m stuck with it.

  • Andrewroywaters

    i40 premium got from basildon hyundai miss sold satnav tmc dont work in england delivery fault in november 2011 still waiting on parts basildon very slow on getting anythink sorted go to a differant delership, head office involved now things are starting to move but still allways waiting on basildon hyundai

  • Thorneel

    I bought one of these i 40′s last January and the fuel economy is no where near as good as they say.I’m driving to the book and am only managing 6.2 – 6.3 litres per 100k combined.

  • geoslom

    IF , I did not have a series 1 , I would consider it

Hyundai i40 Specs

ACTIVE : 1.7L DIESEL TURBO F/INJ - 6 SP AUTOMATIC - 4D WAGON
Car Details
Make
HYUNDAI
Model
i40
Variant
ACTIVE
Series
VF
Year
2011
Body Type
4D WAGON
Seats
5
Engine Specifications
Engine Type
DIESEL TURBO F/INJ
Engine Size
1.7L
Cylinders
DIESEL TURBO 4
Max. Torque
320Nm @  2000rpm
Max. Power
100kW @  6500rpm
Pwr:Wgt Ratio
62.1W/kg
Bore & Stroke
77.2x90mm
Compression Ratio
17
Valve Gear
DUAL OVERHEAD CAM
Drivetrain Specifications
Transmission
6 SP AUTOMATIC
Drive Type
FRONT WHEEL DRIVE
Final Drive Ratio
2.885
Fuel Specifications
Fuel Type
DIESEL
Fuel Tank Capacity
70
Fuel Consumption (Combined)
5.6L / 100km
Weight & Measurement
Kerb Weight
1610
Gross Vehicle Weight
Not Provided
Height
1470mm
Length
4770mm
Width
1815mm
Ground Clearance
140mm
Towing Capacity
Brake:1800  Unbrake:750
Steering & Suspension
Steering Type
RACK & PINION - POWER ASSISTED
Turning Circle
10.95
Front Rim Size
7x16
Rear Rim Size
7x16
Front Tyres
205/60 R16
Rear Tyres
205/60 R16
Wheel Base
2770
Front Track
1591
Rear Track
1597
Front Brakes
DISC - VENTILATED
Rear Brakes
DISC
Standard Features
Comfort
Air Conditioning
Control & Handling
16 Inch Alloy Wheels, Electronic Brake Force Distribution, Electronic Stability Program, Hill Holder, Traction Control System
Driver
Cruise Control, Power Steering, Trip Computer
Entertainment
Radio CD with 6 Speakers
Interior
Cloth Trim
Safety
Dual Airbag Package, Anti-lock Braking, Head Airbags, Side Airbags, Seatbelts - Pre-tensioners Front Seats
Security
Alarm System/Remote Anti Theft, Central Locking Remote Control, Engine Immobiliser
Optional Features
Exterior
Metallic Paint
Other
Service Interval
12 months /  15,000 kms
Warranty
60 months /  999,000 kms
VIN Plate Location
28-H-12
Country of Origin
KOREA