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Classic car fans can rejoice, a company dedicated to keeping the Interceptor dream alive is bringing back the icon with a new heart. The Jensen Interceptor is a classic sports car that was hand-built in the UK by Jensen Motors from 1966 to 1976, when the company went out of business.

So what if there was a new Interceptor, one that could do 11.7L/100km? Powered by General Motors’ 6-litre V8 LS2 engine? Sounds great doesn’t it, well it’s happening and 27 Interceptor lovers have already put their money down.

New 6.0-litre V8 Jensen Interceptor

The makers, Cropredy Bridge Garage, promise at least 307kW, which is enormous for such an outdated chassis.

New 6.0-litre V8 Jensen Interceptor

However thankfully the chassis gets a 21st century make over, the new model comes with independent rear suspension and LSD, APS 6-pot racing brakes with vented disks, seventeen inch wheels with low profile tyres and a GM 4-speed electronic automatic with overdrive.

New 6.0-litre V8 Jensen Interceptor

The interior is also improved with full leather seats and upholstery using new hides and double-stitched with cross-hatching detail in your colour of choice.

New 6.0-litre V8 Jensen Interceptor

But it all comes at a price, a very high price. The car costs £74,960 which is about AUD $155,000.

“This car is a complete rebuild with significant upgrades in performance, quality, and luxury. It stands comparison with other vehicles in this sector and we believe it represents excellent value for money for a unique hand-built vehicle” Mr David Duerden, Technical Director of Cropredy Bridge Garage said.

Do you want one? Although it’s built in the UK, given it’s right-hand drive it can be imported to Australia without too many dramas.

New 6.0-litre V8 Jensen Interceptor

Click here if you’re interested.

New 6.0-litre V8 Jensen Interceptor

Another company tried to build a new Interceptor back in the late 90s which ended up as a disaster. The Jensen S-V8 had an initial production run of 300 deposit paid vehicles costing about £40,000 each, but troubles soon hit the company and only 20 where ever built and the company in charge went bankrupt.




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